Sat.Sep 16, 2023 - Fri.Sep 22, 2023

article thumbnail

Road Hazard: Evidence Mounts on Toxic Pollution from Tires

Yale E360

Researchers are only beginning to uncover the toxic cocktail of chemicals, microplastics, and heavy metals hidden in car and truck tires. But experts say these tire emissions are a significant source of air and water pollution and may be affecting humans as well as wildlife.

363
363
article thumbnail

For Online Disinformation and Hate, X Marks the Spot

Union of Concerned Scientists

It was never hard to find hate and disinformation online, but it’s been much harder to avoid on X (formerly known as Twitter) since Elon Musk bought the platform in July of 2022. Numerous independent sources have documented how prevalent dishonest and hateful speech has become on platform formerly known as Twitter since Musk purchased it last year. Just last week, the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) reported finding that X “continues to host nearly 86% of a set of 300 hateful posts aft

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

article thumbnail

Governor Gavin Newsom announces he will sign landmark climate disclosure bills SB 253 and SB 261!

Legal Planet

Breaking news! Governor Gavin Newsom just announced on stage at New York Climate Week that he will sign both of the landmark greenhouse gas emissions and climate risk disclosure bills, #SB253 (Wiener) and #SB261 (Stern), the later of which was first proposed and then drafted by our Climate Risk Initiative at the Center for Law, Energy and the Environment (CLEE) at Berkeley Law!

article thumbnail

Europa’s underground ocean seems to have the carbon necessary for life

New Scientist

Observations from the James Webb Space Telescope have shown carbon dioxide on the surface of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa – that’s a good sign for the habitability of its buried seas

article thumbnail

The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

article thumbnail

Germany to Surpass 50 Percent Renewable Power This Year, Official Says

Yale E360

Germany is on track to generate more than half of its electricity from renewables this year, an official said Monday.

article thumbnail

Electric Vehicle Sales in US Hit the Accelerator Pedal

Union of Concerned Scientists

With more electric vehicle choices than ever, EV sales in the US are hitting new heights. In just the first half of 2023, over 670,000 EVs were sold with over 80 percent of those fully-electric battery electric vehicles (BEVs ). It took 8 years for the first million EV sales – but now more than a million have been sold in just the past 12 months. EV sales in the US are accelerating and are on pace to exceed one million vehicles per year.

More Trending

article thumbnail

The Equinox Is Not What You Think It Is

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

How Ancient Amazonians Locked Away Thousands of Tons of Carbon in "Dark Earth"

Yale E360

A new study reveals how, by cultivating fertile soil for farming, ancient Amazonians locked away thousands of tons of carbon that have stayed in the ground for centuries.

212
212
article thumbnail

Summer 2023 Is a Wrap: It Showed Us the Inequities of Keeping Cool in Killer Heat

Union of Concerned Scientists

This week, summer 2023 comes to a close on our calendars but will be remembered for its record-shattering extremes, notably, heat—until, that is, the next record-shattering summer supplants it, quite possibly in 2024. Climate change smothered us in heat this season, here in the US and across much of the world , but it has not affected us as equals: some of us can stay relatively safe and cool while many of us cannot and suffer instead.

Cooling 253
article thumbnail

Why is there a Carrot Boycott in Cuyama Valley?

Legal Planet

A boycott banner hangs alongside Highway 166 outside the Cuyama Buckhorn hotel. (Photos by Evan George) When California lawmakers enacted the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act in 2014, it was an effort to tame the wild , wild west of water. Nearly a decade later, there’s been some progress creating local sustainability plans, but Big Ag corporations are still hogging water and bullying smaller groundwater users.

article thumbnail

Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

article thumbnail

The Father of Environmental Justice Exposes the Geography of Inequity

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

After Nearly a Decade of Declines, Africa's White Rhino Population Is Growing

Yale E360

White rhinos saw their numbers grow for the first time since 2012 last year, boosted by efforts to restore the creatures to the African landscape.

2012 207
article thumbnail

Energy Equity: How Can Power Utilities Get It Right? 

Union of Concerned Scientists

Like many other public-serving institutions throughout society, electricity and gas utilities are facing calls to be more equitable in their operations, planning, and treatment of customers. But exactly what is energy equity and what does it mean for utilities to address energy equity directly or consider energy justice more broadly in their work? Energy equity involves confronting the asymmetric suffering faced by the most disadvantaged groups in our communities in the context of access to ener

article thumbnail

The Climate Overshoot Commission Releases its Report

Legal Planet

The Climate Overshoot Commission recently completed its work, releasing its report at the United Nations last Thursday, September 14. This report comes in conjunction with the U.N. General Assembly and a collection of high-level climate and environment events, including the Sustainable Development Goals Summit , 18-19 Sept, and the Climate Ambition Summit , 20 Sept.

article thumbnail

Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

article thumbnail

These Adorable Jellyfish Show Learning Doesn't Even Require a Brain

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

Declassified Logbooks from World War II-Era Warships to Fill Critical Gap in Climate Record

Yale E360

A massive volunteer effort to digitize World War II-era U.S. naval logbooks is helping fill an important gap in the climate record.

204
204
article thumbnail

Memphis Facility Emitting Cancer-Causing Ethylene Oxide Gas to Close

Union of Concerned Scientists

In a major win for community members in South Memphis, Tennessee, a facility emitting a toxic air pollutant— ethylene oxide (EtO)—announced late last month that it will close its doors. UCS featured the facility in its analysis earlier this year of the public health threat EtO poses to communities across the country. The facility in question, Sterilization Services of Tennessee, is one of roughly 90 facilities in the United States and Puerto Rico that use EtO, a toxic colorless gas, to sterilize

article thumbnail

A Summer Job, Record Heat, Climate Hope

Legal Planet

Image by Danielle Anz It’s been three months now since 16 young plaintiffs suing the state of Montana for climate harms piled into a Helena courtroom so small that the attorneys worried whether everyone would fit. (They did.) And it’s been one month since the Montana First District Court determined that the state of Montana had indeed violated Montana youth’s right to a “clean and healthful environment” by collaborating with the fossil fuel industry.

article thumbnail

Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

article thumbnail

Wine's True Origins Are Finally Revealed

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

Earliest evidence of buildings made from wood is 476,000 years old

New Scientist

We tend to think that ancient humans were constantly on the move, but at a site in Zambia there are the first tentative hints that people stayed put and built large wooden dwellings

145
145
article thumbnail

6 Ways STEM Educators Can Enhance Student Engagement in Our Democracy

Union of Concerned Scientists

Educators in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) inspire students daily by revealing what we’ve discovered about the world around us and what we can do next with the latest innovations. STEM educators can also motivate students to use their knowledge and skills beyond the classroom and laboratory and become more civically engaged.

Politics 194
article thumbnail

Captive pandas could be ‘jet lagged’ if their body clocks don’t match their environment

Frontiers

by Angharad Brewer Gillham, Frontiers science writer Image/Shutterstock Animals’ circadian clocks normally get cues from their environments: light cycles, seasonal food availability, and temperature. If these cues are very different to the ones from the latitudes which they have adapted to, it could disrupt their bodies and behavior, like jet lag in humans.

article thumbnail

Artificial Intelligence Could Finally Let Us Talk with Animals

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

The world’s brightest X-ray machine has been turned on

New Scientist

The LCLS-II X-ray laser is unprecedentedly bright, and will make it possible to record exactly what atoms and molecules do during photosynthesis and other chemical reactions

145
145
article thumbnail

The Best and Worst Toilet Paper, Paper Towel, and Facial Tissue Brands

NRDC

Your guide to buying the best sustainable toilet paper, paper towel, and facial tissue brands based on NRDC’s newest Issue with Tissue report. Everything we recommend.

140
140
article thumbnail

Shading the Great Barrier Reef from the sun might slow bleaching-induced coral decline

Frontiers

By Deborah Pirchner, Frontiers science writer Image: Rob Lachlan As ocean temperatures rise, corals can lose their color due to heat stress. Bleaching does not kill corals immediately, but they become more vulnerable to disease and starvation. Shading reefs by covering them with cloth or fog, can protect them from excessive heat. Now, researchers have tested the shading response of two coral species and found that four hours of shade during the hottest time of the day can significantly slow blea

Cooling 141
article thumbnail

Octopuses Used in Research Could Receive Same Protections as Monkeys

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

Exquisite spider fossils from Australia offer clues to their evolution

New Scientist

A large brush-footed trapdoor spider and a small jumping spider from the Miocene Epoch between 11 and 16 million years ago show how different arachnids responded to rapidly changing climate

143
143
article thumbnail

Meet the Giant Isopod of the Deep Sea

Ocean Conservancy

One of the creatures I’m most curious of when I consider the murky shadows of the deep sea is the giant isopod. I was pleased to discover that I’m not the only one who thinks these ancient creatures look just like giant versions of those roly-poly bugs my sister, as a child, would dig for under garden tiles. And I was surprised to find out that these critters are, in fact, relatives.

Ocean 133
article thumbnail

Statement on Thorold City Council’s Unanimous Vote Against a New Gas Plant in Niagara

Enviromental Defense

Keith Brooks, Programs Director, Environmental Defence Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Huron-Wendat – We applaud the members of Thorold City Council for voting unanimously against this unnecessary and highly polluting project. Ontario doesn’t need more gas plants. We are encouraged to see communities like Thorold recognize this and stand up for their residents.

article thumbnail

Why We'll Never Live in Space

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

article thumbnail

'Dark earth' made by Amazon farmers stores carbon for centuries

New Scientist

Nutrient-rich soil known as “dark earth” has been cultivated by Indigenous farmers in the Amazon for centuries, leaving behind a large and still uncounted store of carbon

143
143
article thumbnail

NRDC Stands with Striking Autoworkers

NRDC

NRDC is committed to supporting the UAW, and we pledge to work with the union to ensure no worker is left behind in the transition to the clean car economy.

132
132