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The Planet’s Big Blue Machine: Why the Ocean Engine Matters

Yale E360

The ocean is an enormous engine, turning heat energy into motion, says physicist Helen Czerski. But human activity is threatening that machine — depriving the seas of oxygen, increasing stratification, and potentially changing the currents that influence global weather. Read more on E360 →

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Four Impacts of Ocean Warming

Ocean Conservancy

Well, if you have been reading the news or following our blogs, you know the ocean is getting hotter due to humans burning fossil fuels. In fact, 90% of all global warming is occurring in our ocean. Love ocean content? HABs are also found in Arctic waters as a result of ocean warming in this chilly region.

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New Research Sparks Concerns That Ocean Circulation Will Collapse

Yale E360

Scientists have long feared that warming could cause a breakdown of ocean circulation in the North Atlantic. But new research finds the real risk lies in Antarctica’s waters, where melting could disrupt currents in the next few decades, with profound impacts on global climate. Read more on E360 →

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As Ocean Oxygen Levels Dip, Fish Face an Uncertain Future

Yale E360

Global warming not only increases ocean temperatures, it triggers a cascade of effects that are stripping the seas of oxygen. Fish are already moving to new waters in search of oxygen, and scientists are warning of the long-term threat to fish species and marine ecosystems. Read more on E360 →

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Our Oceans Are Getting Greener, Remote Sensing Reveals

Yale E360

Satellite images have confirmed that the world's oceans have become slightly greener. Scientists suspect climate change is the reason. Read more on E360 →

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Can We Mine the World’s Deep Ocean Without Destroying It?

Yale E360

body charged with regulating deep-ocean mining will soon consider whether to permit the first project to move forward. But ecologist Lisa Levin, who has long studied the deep sea, worries that in the rush for key minerals, a pristine and important ecosystem will be lost. Read more on E360 →

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Captura, AltaSea Plan Ocean Carbon Removal System at Port of Los Angeles

Environment + Energy Leader

Moreover, the partnership will also enable Captura to conduct technology development and ocean modeling work to guide feasibility studies for commercial facilities.

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