2021

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Hurricane Ida Shows Why We Urgently Need Bold, Just and Equitable Climate Action

Union of Concerned Scientists

More catastrophic storms are coming.

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Perspective: More Attention Needed on Freshwater Biodiversity

Circle of Blue

Freshwater species are dying off and decreasing in abundance. Yet conservation funding centers on lands and oceans. Boats ply the waters of the Mekong River Delta, near Can Tho, Vietnam. Home to about 65 million people across four countries, the lower Mekong is also prized for its diversity of aquatic species. Photo © J. Carl Ganter/Circle of Blue. By Stefan Lovgren – December 16, 2021.

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Sensing gravity, the quantum way

Physics World

Much of quantum technology is linked to computing. It is easy to imagine how a better, more powerful computer, capable of solving complex problems, could be useful. But what is a computer, after all, if not a data-processing machine. Computers, quantum or otherwise, transform data into information, which is then used to steer scientific, medical, industrial processes.

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Climate Clues from the Past Prompt a New Look at History

Yale E360

As scientists rapidly improve their ability to decipher past climate upheaval through ice cores and other "proxies,” historians are re-examining previous political and social turmoil and linking it to volcanic eruptions, prolonged droughts, and other disturbances in the natural world. Read more on E360 ?.

Politics 363
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The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

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The IPCC Sixth Assessment Report

Real Climate

Climate scientists are inordinately excited by the release of a new IPCC report (truth be told, that’s a bit odd – It’s a bit like bringing your end-of-(seven)-year project home and waiting anxiously to see how well it will be received). So, in an uncharacteristically enthusiastic burst of effort, we have a whole suite of posts on the report for you to read.

Sea Level 363
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Human brain cells in a dish learn to play Pong faster than an AI

New Scientist

Hundreds of thousands of brain cells in a dish are being taught to play Pong by responding to pulses of electricity – and can improve their performance more quickly than an AI can

More Trending

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Squirrel Parkour? The Science Behind Squirrel Acrobatics

Cool Green Science

Your bird feeder doesn’t stand a chance. New research shows squirrels combine incredible physical abilities with split-second decision making. The post Squirrel Parkour? The Science Behind Squirrel Acrobatics appeared first on Cool Green Science.

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How do Flying Fish “Fly”?

Ocean Conservancy

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a … fish? Although most fish don’t take to the skies, flying fish are one spectacular exception (kind of). Read on to see how flying fish get their distinctive name and learn more fun facts about this small but impressive species. See more wonderful ocean animals! Sorry, but we failed to add you to the list. Please try again or contact 1.888.780.6763.

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When and why did human brains decrease in size 3,000 years ago? New study may have found clues within ants

Frontiers

By Suzanna Burgelman, Frontiers science writer. Image: Yongkiet Jitwattanatam/Shutterstock.com. The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. Now, a new study has brought us closer to understanding some of its evolution. It shows that human brains decreased in size approximately 3,000 years ago. By studying ants as models to illustrate why brains may increase or decrease in size, the researchers hypothesize that brain shrinkage parallels the expansion of collective intelligence in human

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The Rate of Global Warming During Next 25 Years Could Be Double What it Was In The Previous 50, a Renowned Climate Scientist Warns

Inside Climate News

Former NASA climate scientist James Hansen urged Congress decades ago to act on climate change. Now he says he expects reduced aerosol pollution to lead to a steep temperature rise. By Bob Berwyn James Hansen, a climate scientist who shook Washington when he told Congress 33 years ago that human emissions of greenhouse gases were cooking the planet, is now warning that he expects the rate of global warming to double in the next 20 years.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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With Census Data Now Available, You Can Help Protect Democracy: Here’s How

Union of Concerned Scientists

2020 US Census data are now available and accessible–and there are an exciting variety of tools for science and democracy advocates to use this data to demand fair and unbiased districting.

2020 363
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Utah’s Water Dilemma

Circle of Blue

Utah’s Water Dilemma Record-breaking drought along the Wasatch Front forces tough decisions about water supply. Brett Walton, Circle of Blue November 29, 2021. BOX ELDER COUNTY, Utah – Sitting inside a shepherd’s trailer hitched to his white pickup truck, Robert Child recounts a lifetime spent running sheep in the pastures of northern Utah. Wind gently rocks the compact trailer as Child, who is 75, describes the grazing rotations for his 2,000-head flock.

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Entangling a live tardigrade, radiation warning on anti-5G accessories

Physics World

Tardigrades are tiny organisms that can survive extreme environments including being chilled to near absolute zero. At these temperatures quantum effects such as entanglement become dominant, so perhaps it is not surprising that a team of physicists has used a chilled tardigrade to create an entangled qubit. According to a preprint on the arXiv server, the team cooled a tardigrade to below 10 mK and then used it as the dielectric in a capacitor that itself was part of a superconducting transmon

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Three Myths About Renewable Energy and the Grid, Debunked

Yale E360

Renewable energy skeptics argue that because of their variability, wind and solar cannot be the foundation of a dependable electricity grid. But the expansion of renewables and new methods of energy management and storage can lead to a grid that is reliable and clean. Read more on E360 ?.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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Rapid attribution of PNW heatwave

Real Climate

Summary: It was almost impossible for the temperatures seen recently in the Pacific North West heatwave to have occurred without global warming. And only improbable with it. It’s been clear for at least a decade that global warming has been in general increasing the intensity of heat waves, with clear trends in observed maximum temperatures that match what climate models have been predicting.

2018 364
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7200-year-old DNA suggests Denisovans bred with humans on Sulawesi

New Scientist

For the first time, DNA has been extracted from a Stone Age person who lived on Sulawesi – the genetic data suggests Denisovans lived on the island and interbred with humans there

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To Look or Not to Look? That Is the Question

Scientific American

The search for technological relics of extraterrestrial civilizations will inspire the public and attract talent to the field of astronomy. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com.

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The Love Stories of Sleepy Lizards

Cool Green Science

“What’s that on the road?” I wonder out loud, squinting at the dark, oblong shape in the center of the red dirt track. A tree root? A rusted tail-pipe? A weird rock? As we slow down, I recognize the strange… The post The Love Stories of Sleepy Lizards appeared first on Cool Green Science.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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10 Ink-credible Octopus Photos

Ocean Conservancy

October 8 is World Octopus Day, which is the perfect excuse to appreciate these unbelievable cephalopods. To be fair, if you know us, you know we don’t need a reason to celebrate octopuses. You can make every day World Octopus Day by learning more about octopuses on our blog, with posts including: See more wonderful ocean animals! Sorry, but we failed to add you to the list.

Ocean 145
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Surprising discovery in Arctic songbird may reveal how it survives challenging migrations

Frontiers

By K.E.D Coan, science writer. Snow buntings in winter. Image: Mircea Costina/Shutterstock.com. There is still much to learn about how Arctic migratory birds adjust their physiology during different phases of their life. For example, between winter and summer habitats, or during migration. A recent study published to Frontiers shows the first evidence that snow buntings keep their winter traits through migration.

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Florida’s Majestic Manatees Are Starving to Death

Inside Climate News

Deprived of once plentiful seagrass, more than 900 have died this year. Some experts contend they were taken off the endangered species list prematurely. By Amy Green ORLANDO, Fla.—The manatee was too weak to swim.

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Can the US Survive California’s Drought?

Union of Concerned Scientists

California's drought is a national and international crisis.

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Rising Cost of Water in Michigan Leads to Affordability Problems

Circle of Blue

A growing number of Michigan households are burdened by high water bills, report finds. The community action group Detroit Water Brigade delivered water in August 2014 to city residents whose water had been shut off because of late payments. Photo © J. Carl Ganter/Circle of Blue. The rising cost of water and sewer service is a problem across Michigan, but especially for high-poverty communities.

2018 363
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‘Cosmological coupling’ is making black holes bigger, study suggests

Physics World

The observation of black holes with unexpectedly high masses could be partly explained by an effect related to the expansion of the universe, astronomers in the US have proposed. The team, led by Kevin Croker at the University of Hawai’i at M?noa, used comparisons between simulated black hole mergers, and gravitational waves detected by the LIGO–Virgo collaboration, to show how ignoring the expansion of the universe may be limiting our understanding of black-hole physics.

2015 145
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Why Putting Solar Canopies on Parking Lots Is a Smart Green Move

Yale E360

Solar farms are proliferating on undeveloped land, often harming ecosystems. But placing solar canopies on large parking lots offers a host of advantages — making use of land that is already cleared, producing electricity close to those who need it, and even shading cars. Read more on E360 ?.

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We are not reaching 1.5ºC earlier than previously thought

Real Climate

Guest commentary by Malte Meinshausen, Zebedee Nicholls, and Piers Forster. Of all the troubling headlines emerging from the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) WG1 report, one warning will surely dominate headlines in the next days and weeks: Earth is likely to reach the crucial 1.5? warming limit in the early 2030s. In 2018, the IPCC Special Report on 1.5C warming stated in its summary for policy makers that the world was likely to cross the 1.5?

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Katherine Johnson memoir: Her incredible life as a NASA mathematician

New Scientist

The Hollywood movie Hidden Figures made a star of Katherine Johnson, the pioneering NASA mathematician whose talents played a key part in putting the first US astronaut into orbit.

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The Benefits of Vaccinating Kids against COVID Far Outweigh the Risks of Myocarditis

Scientific American

Vaccination is likely to prevent many more COVID cases than it is to cause a rare and nonfatal heart side effect in 5–11-year-olds. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com.

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Buffered by Bears: Why Foxes Hang Out Near A Top Predator

Cool Green Science

A new study suggests gray foxes use bears as a coyote buffer. The post Buffered by Bears: Why Foxes Hang Out Near A Top Predator appeared first on Cool Green Science.

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Meet Our Ocean’s Zebra Sharks

Ocean Conservancy

You’ve heard of great whites. You’ve heard of hammerheads. And you’ve probably heard of makos, whale sharks and bull sharks. But have you heard … of zebra sharks? Move over, tiger sharks—there’s a new wildly-named elasmobranch species in town, and they’re here to show their stripes (sort of). Today, I’m here to walk you through seven sea -riously wild facts about this curious carpet shark species.

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Five Nobel Prize winners publish scientific article collection for children

Frontiers

The Nobel Collection of free scientific articles for next generation of scientists goes live. Young people everywhere now have access to a free collection of scientific articles written by winners of science’s most coveted honor, the Nobel Prize. The Nobel Collection , published by Frontiers, aims to improve young people’s access to learning material about science’s role in addressing today’s global challenges.

2004 145
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A Week After the Pacific Northwest Heat Wave, Study Shows it Was ‘Almost Impossible’ Without Global Warming

Inside Climate News

The extreme temperatures have shaken scientists’ fundamental understanding of heat waves and triggered concerns about a climate tipping point. By Bob Berwyn The high temperatures in late June that killed hundreds of people in Oregon, Washington and Canada were so unusual that they couldn’t have happened without a boost from human-caused global warming, researchers said Wednesday when they released a rapid climate attribution study of the heat wave in the Pacific Northwest.

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Tyson Foods Is a Monster in Disguise

Union of Concerned Scientists

Try as they might, Tyson Foods can't dress up the facts.

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