Sat.Mar 23, 2024 - Fri.Mar 29, 2024

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Baltimore Bridge Collapse Wreaks Havoc on Coal, Car Supply Chains

Scientific American

The sudden destruction of the Francis Scott Key Bridge at the Port of Baltimore has implications for some of the largest U.S.

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Paula García Knows Renewable Energy Is for the People

Union of Concerned Scientists

“Careful with the plants, careful with the trees, careful with the animals,” her grandfather would repeat. Traveling to the southern region of Colombia as a young child, Paula García remembers being taught by her elders about the deep interconnectedness between humans and the natural world. During visits, her family would echo the teachings of their ancestors, perspectives that García still carries with her today.

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New Bill Takes Up Local Oil Drilling Phase-Outs

Legal Planet

When the California Supreme Court ruled last August that Monterey County could not enforce its voter-approved ban on new oil and gas wells, lawyers for Chevron said the company was “pleased” to end the 7 years of litigation. Monterey County is home to the eighth-largest oil field in California, so there was plenty at stake on the face of the case. But this legal battle was about much more than the San Ardo Oil Field; it was the latest in a line of coordinated legal efforts to sow confusion and d

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Update on RGGI in Pennsylvania

Law and Environment

In 2022, Pennsylvania became the 12th member of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (“RGGI”). Pennsylvania joined RGGI pursuant to a 2019 executive order and a subsequent rulemaking promulgated by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection (“DEP”) and Environmental Quality Board (“EQB”). Later that year, various parties—including power producers, coal mine owners, and labor unions (collectively, the “Petitioners”)—filed a lawsuit in the state’s Commonwealth Court alleging that Pennsyl

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Manufacturing Sustainability Surge: Your Guide to Data-Driven Energy Optimization & Decarbonization

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets.

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Tooth loss linked to early signs of Alzheimer’s disease

New Scientist

A brain region critical for memory is smaller in older adults with fewer than 10 teeth than in those who have most of their teeth, suggesting that tooth loss may precede the development of dementia

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UCS Testimony on the Clean Hydrogen Production Tax Credit

Union of Concerned Scientists

From March 25 to March 27, 2024, the U.S. Department of the Treasury is hosting a public hearing on the December 2023 proposed regulations governing implementation of the Section 45V Credit for Production of Clean Hydrogen. My comments, to be presented on March 27, are copied below. They focus on four key issues from the full set of technical comments UCS submitted to the record in February: correctness of Treasury’s overall approach; necessity of the three-pillars framework; need for updating u

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Environmental Defence Experts React to the 2024 Ontario Budget

Enviromental Defense

Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat – Environmental Defence experts react to the 2024 Ontario budget, released today. Keith Brooks, Programs Director: This budget once again shows that the Ontario government doesn’t take climate change seriously and is uninterested in being truthful when it comes to the costs of climate change and climate policies.

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Spreading rock dust on farms boosts crop yields and captures CO2

New Scientist

We already have evidence that rock dust can remove carbon dioxide from the air – now there are signs that spreading the dust on farm fields also enhances crop growth

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Sinking Coastal Lands Will Exacerbate the Flooding from Sea Level Rise in 24 US Cities, New Research Shows

Inside Climate News

In the affected cities, as many as 500,000 people and one in every 35 properties could be impacted by the flooding, and communities of color face disproportionate effects. By Moriah McDonald Flooding could affect one out of every 50 residents in 24 coastal cities in the United States by the year 2050, a study led by Virginia Tech researchers suggests.

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A Word on Congestion Pricing

Legal Planet

Yesterday, New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority approved the city’s long-planned and hotly debated congestion pricing program , the first of its kind in the US. The program will involve a $15 toll for vehicles entering midtown or lower Manhattan, with discounts for some qualifying drivers and credits for bridge and tunnel tolls so drivers aren’t double-charged.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Orca Groups with Radically Different Cultures Are Actually Separate Species

Scientific American

“Resident” and “transient” killer whales, or orcas, have unique hunting habits and genetics, proving they are in fact separate species

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Most accurate clock ever can tick for 40 billion years without error

New Scientist

The record for the most accurate clock has been broken in an experiment with strontium atoms almost as cold as absolute zero, and it is twice as accurate as any predecessor

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Biochar Is ‘Low-Hanging Fruit’ for Sequestering Carbon and Combating Climate Change

Inside Climate News

Made from heating wood and other biomass at high temperatures with no oxygen, biochar mixed in soils dominated the carbon offset marketplace last year in tons of warming gases absorbed from the atmosphere. By Lindsey Byman WASHINGTON – Since David Laird was young, the “lush, green forests” of the western United States meant an annual summer trip to hike, camp and fish.

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What is Premier Smith’s Problem with Renewable Energy?

Enviromental Defense

The Premier of Alberta has a problem with renewable energy. In August of 2023, Premier Smith imposed a seven-month industry-wide moratorium on new approvals for wind, solar, geothermal, and other forms of renewable energy. The halt cost clean energy investors, renewable energy companies, and provincial and municipal governments more than $30 billion in delayed, deferred, or lost investments and taxes.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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First-Ever Magnetic Map of Milky Way's Black Hole Reveals a Mystery

Scientific American

Polarized light from Sagittarius A*, our galaxy's supermassive black hole, shows swirling magnetic fields that may hint at the presence of an unseen jet

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We've glimpsed something that behaves like a particle of gravity

New Scientist

Gravitons, the particles thought to carry gravity, have never been seen in space – but something very similar has been detected in a semiconductor

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California’s Latino Communities Most at Risk From Exposure to Brain-Damaging Weed Killer

Inside Climate News

Growers’ use of the neurotoxic weed killer paraquat is concentrated in just five agricultural counties, leaving low-income Latinos disproportionately exposed to a chemical linked to Parkinson’s disease, a new analysis shows. By Liza Gross Evidence linking one of the nation’s most widely used commercial weed killers to Parkinson’s disease first emerged in the 1980s.

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All About Whitespotted Eagle Rays

Ocean Conservancy

Just like a snowflake falling from the sky, the whitespotted eagle ray is unique; no two are exactly the same. The whitespotted eagle ray is a beautiful sight to behold with its long pointy tail and its body spotted with white dots. The whitespotted eagle ray ( Aetobatus narinari ) is a cartilaginous fish—and one of the ocean’s largest rays. The genus name Aetobatus comes from the Greek word aetos meaning “eagle” and batis meaning “ray.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Does Long-Term Benadryl Use Increase Dementia Risk?

Scientific American

Benadryl, which contains diphenhydramine, is a drugstore mainstay and just one medication out of many that could possibly damage brain health

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Dust clouds from the Sahara are reaching Europe more frequently

New Scientist

Changes in wind patterns and desertification may be increasing the amount of dust from the Sahara desert blown over western Europe and the frequency of these events

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From Michigan to Nebraska, Midwest States Face an Early Wildfire Season

Inside Climate News

The blazes come after a record dry winter in the region. “Year to date, we've had close to 300 wildfires statewide,” a Wisconsin official said. “The normal year-to-date 10-year average is about 40 fires.” By Kristoffer Tigue The Midwest received some much needed moisture this week following an especially hot and dry winter that hamstrung outdoor recreation and sparked an early spring wildfire season in several states.

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Working hard or hardly working? Modelling success of current grassland agri-environment schemes

The Applied Ecologist

Shortlisted for the Georgina Mace Prize 2023 In this blog post, author Bede West describe his team’s study analysing the potential for agri-environment schemes to achieve positive changes in plant biodiversity. Plants and soils are the trophic foundations of most temperate terrestrial ecosystems but they are being progressively impacted by climate change, biodiversity loss and a plethora of other environmental impacts.

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Baltimore Bridge Collapse Will Teach Engineers to Build Safer Infrastructure

Scientific American

The loss of Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge after a cargo ship collision will teach engineers how to design structures better able to withstand disasters

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Horses used in therapy often avoid people if they are given a choice

New Scientist

Horses show signs of stress if people touch them while they are tethered, but they appear much less anxious if they are able to walk away

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Feature- Remembering March 28, 1979 At The Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant - The Accident No One Thought Would Happen

PA Environment Daily

Forty-five years ago on March 28, 1979, Pennsylvanians woke up to a much different world -- the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Dauphin County. The fear and uncertainty about what was going to happen-- Was there a “bubble”? Wasn’t there a bubble? Should we evacuate or not? Have we already been “irradiated” invisibly and don’t know it?

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USDA Finalizes Voluntary “Product of USA” Rule

National Law Center

In March 2024, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) finalized its rule regarding the voluntary use of the labeling terms. The post USDA Finalizes Voluntary “Product of USA” Rule appeared first on National Agricultural Law Center.

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Song Lyrics Really Are Getting Simpler and More Repetitive, Study Finds

Scientific American

An assessment of hundreds of thousands of songs confirms that choruses and hooks have taken over—but simpler isn’t necessarily worse

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Tiny deer from the dry valleys of Peru recognised as new species

New Scientist

A 38-centimetre-tall deer, found in an arid region in the central Andes, is the first new deer species found in South America for over 60 years

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PA Oil & Gas Weekly Compliance Dashboard - March 16 to 22 - Truck Rollover; 12 More Abandoned Wells; Failure To Submit Annual Reports; Another Chewed Wastewater Line Leaking

PA Environment Daily

From March 16 to 22, DEP’s Oil and Gas Compliance Database shows oil and gas inspectors filed 609 inspection entries. As of March 15 of this year , DEP-- -- NOVs Issued In Last Week: 148 conventional, 0 unconventional -- Year To Date - NOVs Issued: 2,217 conventional and 207 unconventional -- Enforcements 2024: 110 conventional and 24 unconventional -- Inspections Last Week: 225 conventional and 362 unconventional -- Year To Date - Inspections: 3,373 conventional and 5,396 unconventional -- Well

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Elizabeth Tinsley: Bats are avoiding solar sites

The Applied Ecologist

Shortlisted for the 2023 Southwood Prize Elizabeth Tinsley talks us through how she and colleagues conducted a paired study at 19 ground-mounted solar PV developments in southwest England. Through the use of static detectors to record bat echolocation calls and the development of generalised linear mixed-effect models, it was determined that ground-mounted solar photovoltaic developments have a significant negative effect on bat activity.

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What Climate Change Means for Your Garden

Scientific American

Climate change is affecting every aspect of gardening, including what plants thrive where, which can survive multiple years, whether trees bear fruit, and what pests are most threatening

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Why ivy growing on your walls may actually be beneficial

New Scientist

Long considered damaging to walls, a living coating of ivy can actually stabilise temperature and humidity and lower your energy bills, finds James Wong

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DEP, PennDOT, Keep PA Beautiful Encourage Everyone ‘Pick Up Pennsylvania’ During Spring Litter Cleanup

PA Environment Daily

On March 28, the Departments of Environmental Protection and Transportation and Keep PA Beautiful encouraged residents, local leaders, businesses, and organizations to join in cleaning up their communities as part of the “ Pick Up Pennsylvania " spring community improvement campaign, now through May 31. Pick Up Pennsylvania is a year-long initiative, however, events scheduled from March 1 through May 31 receive free trash bags, gloves, and safety vests provided by support from DEP, PennDOT and K

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