Sat.Apr 13, 2024 - Fri.Apr 19, 2024

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A Highway in Indiana Could One Day Charge Your EV While You’re Driving It

Inside Climate News

Construction of the pilot project on U.S. Highway 52 began this month. State officials hope it can help quell range anxiety and electrify long-haul trucks. By Kristoffer Tigue Blake Dollier spoke excitedly as he watched the construction crews pulverize concrete along a quarter-mile stretch of U.S. Highway 52 where it passes through West Lafayette, Indiana.

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What is cloud seeding and did it cause the floods in Dubai?

New Scientist

Cloud seeding almost certainly did not play a significant role in the flooding on the Arabian peninsula this week – but the heavy rains may have been exacerbated by climate change

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Experts at Environmental Defence React to Canada’s Federal Budget

Enviromental Defense

Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat. Keith Brooks, Programs Director: “This budget is intended to be geared towards younger generations, but it fails to deal with a major source of anxiety for young people by offering little to address climate change. Young people will bear the brunt of the impacts of the climate crisis.

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Flint Water Crisis: Everything You Need to Know

NRDC

After officials repeatedly dismissed claims that Flint’s water was making people sick, residents took action. Here’s how the lead contamination crisis unfolded—and what we can learn from it.

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The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

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Colon Cancer Linked to Mouth Bacteria

Scientific American

Genomic research of Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from colon cancer tumors may help researchers develop future screening tests and cancer vaccines

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Songs that birds 'sing' in their dreams translated into sound

New Scientist

By measuring how birds’ vocal muscles move while they are asleep and using a physical model for how those muscles produce sound, researchers have pulled songs from the minds of sleeping birds

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Meet the World’s Largest Freshwater Crayfish

Cool Green Science

National Geographic Society & TNC extern Zoe Clark shares her experience studying the 13-pound Tasmanian giant crayfish. The post Meet the World’s Largest Freshwater Crayfish appeared first on Cool Green Science.

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What Philosopher Ibn Sina Can Teach Us about AI

Scientific American

A philosopher who lived centuries before artificial intelligence might be able to help us understand the field's personhood questions

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Ancient marine reptile found on UK beach may be the largest ever

New Scientist

The jawbone of an ichthyosaur uncovered in south-west England has been identified as a new species, and researchers estimate that the whole animal was 20 to 25 metres long

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Guest Essay: Claims That Only Thermal Energy Resources Can Ensure Electric Grid Reliability Don’t Pass The Laugh Test

PA Environment Daily

By John Quigley, Kleinman Center For Energy Policy , University of Pennsylvania The challenge of decarbonizing the electricity grid while ensuring its reliability is acute in Pennsylvania. So is the level of misdirection in the policy debate. The Commonwealth is the nation’s third-largest electricity producer , and exports more of it than any other state.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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TAXPAYER DOLLARS SHOULD NOT BE FUELING CLIMATE POLLUTION

Enviromental Defense

Paying taxes helps governments to fund the services we all depend on, like education, healthcare and funding programs to tackle the climate crisis. Taxes also allow the federal government to provide subsidies to support a specific industry, like sports or culture, or to achieve a desired social outcome. However, for decades governments have also provided oil and gas companies with significant subsidies and other types of financial support.

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Human Brains May Be Getting Bigger

Scientific American

Brain size in one Massachusetts community has steadily increased since the 1930s, possibly explaining why dementia is trending lower nationwide

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Early humans spread as far north as Siberia 400,000 years ago

New Scientist

A site in Siberia has evidence of human presence 417,000 years ago, raising the possibility that hominins could have reached North America much earlier than we thought

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NOAA Declares a Global Coral Bleaching Event in 2023

Inside Climate News

Scientists warn that the die off hit previously unaffected areas and more resilient species. Reef declines are leaving coastal communities increasingly vulnerable to storm surges. By Bob Berwyn From shallow-water reefs in the Red Sea to graceful gorgonian species in the Caribbean and the rugged branching corals that form the structure of the Great Barrier Reef, the past year brought bleaching, decline and death to coral reefs around the world.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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Viewpoint: Heating homes with supercomputers

A Greener Life

Photo credit: Keith Hunter / University of Edinburgh. By Jeremy Williams Did you know that Britain has a national supercomputer? It’s hosted at the Advanced Computing Facility at the University of Edinburgh and it’s used on our crunchiest problems, such as climate modelling or processing health data. It’s in the news this week because of a trial of a new heating idea – an idea that chimes nicely with the seasonal heat storage technologies I was writing about recently.

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Scientists Discover Extensive Brain-Wave Patterns

Scientific American

Certain brain layers specialize in particular waves—which might aid understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders

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Sleeping bumblebees can survive underwater for a week

New Scientist

A serendipitous lab accident revealed that hibernating bumblebee queens can make it through days of flooding, revealing that they are less vulnerable to extreme weather than previously thought

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This Bird Is Evolving Right in Front of Us

PBS Nature

In the early 2000s, an invasive snail species took over these Florida wetlands. These invasive snails were too big for many of Florida's snail kites to consume so many birds vanished. But ten years later, these birds made an unbelievable recovery.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Little Juniata River Assn.: More Than 100 Volunteers Clean Up 30 Miles Of River Banks In Huntingdon, Blair Counties

PA Environment Daily

On April 13, the Little Juniata River Association held its 19th Annual River Bank Clean Up that attracted over 100 volunteers to clean up 30 miles of river banks from Barrie, Huntingdon County to Altoona, Blair County. Volunteers filled two 40 foot dumpsters with litter and trash. The LJRA is an Adopt-a-highway group with PennDOT and has received many awards from state agencies, environmental nonprofits and national organizations for its effective protection and improvement of this Central Penns

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If Alien Life Is Found, How Should Scientists Break the News?

Scientific American

At a recent workshop, researchers and journalists debated how to announce a potential discovery of extraterrestrial life

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Ancient Maya burned their dead rulers to mark a new dynasty

New Scientist

In the foundations of a Maya temple, researchers found the charred bones of royal individuals – possibly evidence of a fiery ritual to mark the end of one dynasty and the beginning of another

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Statement: Alberta’s Water-Sharing Agreement Must Acknowledge Climate Change

Enviromental Defense

Statement from Stephen Legault, Senior Manager, Alberta Energy Transition Canmore | Traditional territories of the Treaty 7 Nations – We are glad to see the Alberta government taking steps to address the province’s water crisis, but the Minister of Environment and Parks Rebecca Shultz has failed to acknowledge the root cause of this drought, which is climate change.

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Keystone Trails Assn. Welcomes 3 New Staff Members To Expand Presence In Bedford, Clinton & Lancaster Counties

PA Environment Daily

On April 15, the Keystone Trails Association is pleased to announce the appointment of three new staff members: Al Germann as Regional Trail Care Coordinator in the PA Wilds, Kate Prisby as Manager of Events and Programs, and Haley Feaster as Manager of Communications and Development. Once an all-volunteer organization with only a few staff, KTA is transitioning to a staff-driven organization destined to expand its reach and impact on the hiking community and trails preservation in Pennsylvania.

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Anti-Trans Efforts Use Misinformation, Epistemological Violence and Gender Essentialism

Scientific American

Three types of misinformation are being used against transgender people: oversimplifying scientific knowledge, fabricating and misinterpreting research and promoting false equivalences

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A surprisingly enormous black hole has been found in our galaxy

New Scientist

A black hole 33 times the mass of the sun is the largest stellar black hole ever spotted, and its strange companion star could help explain how it got so huge

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Watch Out for Nettles

Ocean Conservancy

Sometimes when you live in a big city like Baltimore, you forget that you are still living in a vibrant ecosystem. One of my favorite things to do with friends is to spot some of the incredible sea creatures that live in our harbor. One of my favorite animal neighbors is the Atlantic bay nettles, which were recently discovered to be a different species of sea nettle that lives in the Chesapeake Bay.

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Original Student 'Hellbender Defenders' Celebrate 5-Year Anniversary Of PA's Official State Amphibian And Clean Water Ambassador

PA Environment Daily

Five years ago this month and clad in a blue “HELLBENDER DEFENDER” t-shirt, Gov. Tom Wolf signed legislation designating the Eastern hellbender as Pennsylvania’s official state amphibian. Gathered around him was an excited group of passionate teenagers who made it happen. Those original “Hellbender Defenders” have been inspired to pursue careers in the fields of conservation, education, and the environment.

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Guilt-Tripping for the Public Good Often Achieves Its Intended Result

Scientific American

The emerging science of laying guilt through public messaging can help safeguard the planet and improve health behaviors

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How to see the Lyrid meteor shower and when is the peak?

New Scientist

Caused by debris from a comet thought to originate in the Oort Cloud, the Lyrid meteor shower peaks this year on 22 April and is best viewed from the northern hemisphere, says Abigail Beall

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Poll: People Want Action on Plastics for Health and Wildlife

NRDC

New poll results show overwhelming public support for government action to address the plastic crisis, including a strong global plastics treaty.

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DEP Posted 74 Pages Of Permit-Related Notices In April 20 PA Bulletin

PA Environment Daily

Highlights of the environmental and energy notices in the April 20 PA Bulletin -- -- PA Oil & Gas Industrial Facilities: Permit Notices, Opportunities To Comment - April 20 [PaEN] -- The Susquehanna River Basin Commission published notice in the April 20 PA Bulletin announcing a May 2 hearing on water use requests, including seven shale gas drilling-related requests in Lycoming, Susquehanna, Tioga and Wyoming counties.

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We Need to Make Cities Less Car-Dependent

Scientific American

Reducing the need for car travel is better for health, the environment and public safety

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A new understanding of tinnitus and deafness could help reverse both

New Scientist

Investigations of the paradoxical link between tinnitus and hearing loss have revealed a hidden form of deafness, paving the way to possible new treatments

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