September, 2023

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Thinking Long-Term: Why We Should Bring Back Redwood Forests

Yale E360

Only 5 percent of the redwood forests that once stretched across coastal Northern California have never been logged. An initiative to restore these forests is gaining momentum, aided by research showing that redwoods store more aboveground carbon than any forest on Earth.

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The Secret to Beetles' Unfathomable Diversity

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Statement on Premier Ford canceling $8.28-billion Greenbelt land removals

Enviromental Defense

Statement from Phil Pothen, Ontario Environment Program Manager on Premier Ford canceling $8.28-billion Greenbelt land removals Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat – “While we welcome Premier Ford’s full reversal of the inappropriate removals of Greenbelt lands, the Ontario government’s $8.3 billion gift to developers represented just the most visible part of a dishonest and counterproductive push for sprawl tha

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For Online Disinformation and Hate, X Marks the Spot

Union of Concerned Scientists

It was never hard to find hate and disinformation online, but it’s been much harder to avoid on X (formerly known as Twitter) since Elon Musk bought the platform in July of 2022. Numerous independent sources have documented how prevalent dishonest and hateful speech has become on platform formerly known as Twitter since Musk purchased it last year. Just last week, the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) reported finding that X “continues to host nearly 86% of a set of 300 hateful posts aft

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Manufacturing Sustainability Surge: Your Guide to Data-Driven Energy Optimization & Decarbonization

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets.

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As Soon as Possible

Real Climate

The latest contrarian crowd pleaser from Soon et al (2023) is just the latest repetition of the old “it was the sun wot done it” trope[1] that Willie Soon and his colleagues have been pushing for decades. There is literally nothing new under the sun. Before diving into the specific artifices in the latest paper, a little trip down history lane might be fun to set the context… “It’s the Sun” Solar variability as a potential cause for climate change has a long (

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Captive pandas could be ‘jet lagged’ if their body clocks don’t match their environment

Frontiers

by Angharad Brewer Gillham, Frontiers science writer Image/Shutterstock Animals’ circadian clocks normally get cues from their environments: light cycles, seasonal food availability, and temperature. If these cues are very different to the ones from the latitudes which they have adapted to, it could disrupt their bodies and behavior, like jet lag in humans.

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Why Do We Forget So Many of Our Dreams?

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Canada’s New Carbon Management Strategy Jeopardizes its Chance of Meeting its Climate Targets

Enviromental Defense

We are disappointed that Canada’s Carbon Management Strategy , released by Minister Wilkinson, doubles down on the federal government’s risky approach of over-reliance on speculative and dangerous technologies being promoted primarily by oil and gas companies. This approach jeopardizes any chance Canada has of meeting its climate targets and diverts tens of billions of dollars away from reliable and effective climate solutions.

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Children’s Developing Brains Need Protection from Pollutants

Union of Concerned Scientists

While all of us are susceptible to the effects of pollution, children, infants, and fetuses in utero are uniquely sensitive to pollutants as their young brains grow and develop. Special protection from pollutants is needed because of the speed and timing of brain development early in life, before and after birth. In her book, A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind , science writer Harriet Washington makes the case that environmental assaults on the d

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NASA’s UFO task force has released its final report – it’s not aliens

New Scientist

An independent task force formed by NASA to look into unidentified anomalous phenomena found no evidence of alien craft, and suggests that if we want to find proof of visitors we need better data

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Crowding Out Cougars

Inside Climate News

Expanded development on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, viewed as a climate refuge, is encroaching on prime wildlife habitat. As big cats find it harder to avoid people, many are winding up dead. By Liza Gross, Photos by Michael Kodas This story was supported in part by the Society of Environmental Journalists’ Fund for Environmental Journalism.

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From Carbon Sink to Source: The Stark Changes in Arctic Lakes

Yale E360

For millennia, lakes in Greenland’s dry tundra have locked up huge loads of carbon in their sediment. But as the region becomes warmer and wetter, scientists believe these lakes are becoming sources of carbon, which could have major consequences for the world’s climate.

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How to See the 'Ring of Fire' Annular Solar Eclipse of October 14

Scientific American

This annular solar eclipse will only reveal its full glory to a select few, but onlookers across much of the Western Hemisphere can catch a partial glimpse of the dazzling phenomenon

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Media Advisory: Environmental Defence and Other Groups in Ontario to Rally Against Greenbelt Removals

Enviromental Defense

Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Huron-Wendat – In early November, 2022, the provincial government announced Bill 23 (“More Homes Built Faster Act”), the rollback of forward-thinking municipal plans in Halton and Hamilton, and the removal of 7,400 acres of protected land from the Greenbelt to build sprawl.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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Shading the Great Barrier Reef from the sun might slow bleaching-induced coral decline

Frontiers

By Deborah Pirchner, Frontiers science writer Image: Rob Lachlan As ocean temperatures rise, corals can lose their color due to heat stress. Bleaching does not kill corals immediately, but they become more vulnerable to disease and starvation. Shading reefs by covering them with cloth or fog, can protect them from excessive heat. Now, researchers have tested the shading response of two coral species and found that four hours of shade during the hottest time of the day can significantly slow blea

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The world’s brightest X-ray machine has been turned on

New Scientist

The LCLS-II X-ray laser is unprecedentedly bright, and will make it possible to record exactly what atoms and molecules do during photosynthesis and other chemical reactions

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Time for New York City to Act on Extreme Heat

NRDC

The September heat wave now enveloping New York is a reminder that the time has arrived for officials in the nation’s largest city to further protect its residents from the dangers of extreme heat.

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A Summer Light Show Dims: Why Are Fireflies Disappearing?

Yale E360

Fireflies — whose shimmering, magical glows light up summer nights — are in trouble, threatened by habitat destruction, light pollution, and pesticide use. With 18 species now considered at risk of extinction in North America alone, recovery efforts are only just beginning.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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The Loss of Dark Skies Is So Painful, Astronomers Coined a New Term for It

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Statement on Premier Doug Ford failing to meaningfully back down on plans to hand over Greenbelt lands to developers

Enviromental Defense

Statement by Phil Pothen, Ontario Environment Program Manager, Environmental Defence, on Premier Doug Ford failing to meaningful back down on plans to hand over Greenbelt lands to developers Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Huron-Wendat – This morning Premier Doug Ford continued to resist calls to reverse the environmentally disastrous $8.3 billion attack on Greenbelt lands.

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Like Canaries in a Coal Mine, Dragonflies Signal Threats to Freshwater Ecosystems

Inside Climate News

Research shows that some dragonfly and damselfly species may decline to near-extinction by 2100 as a result of climate change and human intervention in their habitats. Yet some freshwater ecosystems could see an increase in such species and more generally in biodiversity. By Juanita Gordon In gauging the growing threats to freshwater biodiversity, dragonflies and damselflies are viewed by ecologists as sentinels, reacting to threats by seeking out more stable homes.

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Exquisite spider fossils from Australia offer clues to their evolution

New Scientist

A large brush-footed trapdoor spider and a small jumping spider from the Miocene Epoch between 11 and 16 million years ago show how different arachnids responded to rapidly changing climate

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The Best and Worst Toilet Paper, Paper Towel, and Facial Tissue Brands

NRDC

Your guide to buying the best sustainable toilet paper, paper towel, and facial tissue brands based on NRDC’s newest Issue with Tissue report. Everything we recommend.

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As Waters Rise, a Community Must Decide: Do We Stay or Go?

Yale E360

Faced with more frequent flooding and worse to come, the Philadelphia environmental justice community of Eastwick is grappling with difficult questions about its future: Will levees and flood walls protect them, or should residents abandon their homes and move to higher ground?

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Is Consciousness Part of the Fabric of the Universe?

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Statement on Thorold City Council’s Unanimous Vote Against a New Gas Plant in Niagara

Enviromental Defense

Keith Brooks, Programs Director, Environmental Defence Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Huron-Wendat – We applaud the members of Thorold City Council for voting unanimously against this unnecessary and highly polluting project. Ontario doesn’t need more gas plants. We are encouraged to see communities like Thorold recognize this and stand up for their residents.

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What High Heat in the Classroom Is Doing to Millions of American Children

Inside Climate News

With too many schools ill-prepared for the impacts of climate change, research shows that excessive temperatures affect students’ ability to concentrate, perform and think clearly. From our collaborating partner “Living on Earth,” public radio’s environmental news magazine , an interview by Producer Paloma Beltran with Dr. Joseph Allen of Harvard University’s T.H.

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Earliest evidence of buildings made from wood is 476,000 years old

New Scientist

We tend to think that ancient humans were constantly on the move, but at a site in Zambia there are the first tentative hints that people stayed put and built large wooden dwellings

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Rewild or Restore – how about doing both?

The Applied Ecologist

James Bullock and Nathalie Pettorelli summarise their Perspective piece that highlight the potential for integrating restoration and rewilding agendas into whole landscape approaches. As biodiversity continues to decline at an alarming pace, it is becoming more urgent to not only halt these losses but to reverse them.

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Edible Insects: In Europe, a Growing Push for Bug-Based Food

Yale E360

To rein in emissions, the E.U. is looking to insects as an alternate source of protein for livestock and people and is easing regulations and subsidizing makers of insect-derived food. In a photo essay, Luigi Avantaggiato explores the emerging bug food industry in northern Italy.

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Autism, Human Connection and the 'Double Empathy' Problem

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Alberta’s attack on renewables makes the case for a stop to oil sands production

Enviromental Defense

Alberta’s current pause on new wind and solar projects is bad for business and for Alberta’s climate goals. However, it is true that no industry should operate without a clear understanding of the potential environmental impacts of their projects, and a clear plan for how they will clean up any mess left behind. And so, Alberta just made the case for a moratorium on production in the tar sands.

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Understanding Unsuccessful Climate Litigation: The Spanish Greenpeace Case

Law Columbia

On June 20, 2023, the Spanish Supreme Court handed down its final ruling in the case of Greenpeace v. Spain II , widely known as the trial for climate (“ el juicio por el clima ”). The decision, formally communicated to the parties on July 27, marks a pivotal moment in climate litigation. In this case, environmental and human rights organizations, including Greenpeace and Oxfam (“the plaintiffs”), had taken legal action against the Government of Spain, alleging inadequate action on climate chang