August, 2023

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Global Fossil Fuel Subsidies Reached $7 Trillion in 2022, an All-Time High

Yale E360

Global subsidies for fossil fuels reached $7 trillion in 2022, an all-time high, according to the International Monetary Fund.

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Another Supply Chain Issue

Legal Planet

To make the energy transition work, we’ll need a lot more energy lawyers. That means a lot of energy law profs to teach them — many more than we have today. Law schools are waking up to the need to hire in the area. So if you’re thinking of law teaching, it could be worthwhile to dive into this field. Let’s start with the first question: why do we need more energy lawyers?

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The AMOC: tipping this century, or not?

Real Climate

A few weeks ago, a study by Copenhagen University researchers Peter and Susanne Ditlevsen concluded that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is likely to pass a tipping point already this century, most probably around mid-century. Given the catastrophic consequences of an AMOC breakdown, the study made quite a few headlines but also met some skepticism.

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In New Scramble for Africa, an Arab Sheikh Is Taking the Lead

Yale E360

A company established by a Dubai sheikh is finalizing agreements with African nations to manage vast tracts of their forests and sell the carbon credits. Critics are concerned the deals will not benefit Africans and will just help foreign governments perpetuate high emissions.

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The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

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Green Jobs for Gender Equality

NRDC

Guest blog by Akanksha Golchha Countries around the world affirmed their commitment to gender equality and empowering women as agents of change in the clean energy transition at the G20 Energy Transitions Ministers’ Meeting in Goa, India. While India’s focus on.

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Where Do Electric Trucks Charge?

Union of Concerned Scientists

We are about to enter the era of the electric truck. Sure, there are already a few thousand electric trucks and buses on US roads already. Now, with the California Air Resources Board’s passage of the Advanced Clean Fleets Rule in May and with the potential for a (hopefully) stronger-than-proposed greenhouse gas standard for heavy-duty trucks passed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the coming months, we will begin to see a significant switch from highly-polluting diesel trucks

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Vitamin C and E supplements may make lung cancers grow faster

New Scientist

Supplementing with antioxidants such as vitamins C and E could increase the formation of blood vessels within lung cancer tumours, helping them to grow bigger and spread, according to a study in mice

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Statement on the Integrity Commissioner’s Findings that Ontario’s Housing Minister Breached Integrity Rules in Removing Land from the Greenbelt

Enviromental Defense

Statement by Phil Pothen, Ontario Environment Program Manager, Environmental Defence, on Integrity Commissioner’s Findings that Ontario’s Housing Minister Breached Integrity Rules in Removing Land from the Greenbelt Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Huron-Wendat – Today’s report by Integrity Commissioner David Wake revealed integrity breaches by Housing Minister Steve Clark, as well as political involvement by the Pr

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If South Africa Ends Lion Breeding, What to Do with Captive Cats?

Yale E360

In 2021, the South African government committed to shutting down the country’s captive-lion breeding industry, which provided animals for canned hunts. Among the sticking points slowing progress is what should happen to the thousands of lions that remain on private ranches.

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Scientists develop finger sweat test to detect antipsychotic drugs in patients

Frontiers

by Angharad Brewer Gillham, Frontiers science writer Image/Shutterstock.com Maintaining a regimen of antipsychotic drugs can be difficult, but going off them unexpectedly can have disastrous health consequences for patients. Traditionally, monitoring patients on these drugs involves blood tests, which can be painful and time-consuming. A quick, non-invasive finger sweat test newly developed by scientists could replace these blood tests and make patients’ lives easier.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Boston-Area Communities Work Together to Beat the Heat

Union of Concerned Scientists

We are halfway through this year’s Danger Season —the period between May and October when climate change makes extreme weather events more likely—and the unprecedented ferocity and scale of extreme weather have been making headlines and impacting our lives. In the Northeast, we have seen the haze and breathed air heavy with the smoke from Canadian wildfires.

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Rare Superheavy Oxygen Isotope Is Detected at Last

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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AI beats champion human pilots in head-to-head drone races

New Scientist

The Swift AI has beaten expert drone racers in high-speed races using an on-board computer that fuses artificial intelligence and classical algorithms – a method that could speed up delivery drones

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More States Are Requiring Flood Disclosure

NRDC

New home buyers and renters should have a right to know a property’s flood history before they commit to calling it home.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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For Decades, Our Carbon Emissions Sped the Growth of Plants — Not Anymore

Yale E360

For the last century, rising levels of carbon dioxide helped plants grow faster, a rare silver lining in human-caused climate change. But now, as drier conditions set in across much of the globe, that uptick in growth is leveling off, a new study finds.

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Warmer Waters Put Sea Turtles on a Collision Course With Humans

Inside Climate News

More turtles on Cape Cod’s shores means a higher risk of boat strikes. By Georgia Hall, Provincetown Independent WELLFLEET, Mass.—Rising North Atlantic Ocean temperatures are causing increased numbers of threatened and endangered sea turtles to migrate through Massachusetts waters — heading north in search of food, then back south to their breeding grounds.

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DEP Responds To Emergency Notification Of Uncontrolled Venting Of Natural Gas For Over 10.5 Hours From A Repsol Oil Shale Gas Well In Bradford County

PA Environment Daily

At 2:02 a.m. on August 28, 2023 , DEP received an emergency notification of an uncontrolled venting of natural gas from shale gas well 9H at the Repsol Oil and Gas USA LLC Cummings Lumber well pad in Troy Township, Bradford County. Repsol said the well started venting natural gas from the producing and surface casing annulus for 10.5 hours starting at 4:00 p.m.

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The Last Super Blue Moon until 2037 Rises Tonight. Here's How to See It

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Our ancestors may have come close to extinction 900,000 years ago

New Scientist

A genetic analysis suggests our ancestral population fell as low as around 1300 individuals nearly a million years ago, but other experts aren't convinced

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At Long Last, the Vision of the Grand Canyon Tribal Coalition Is Realized

NRDC

The designation of the Baaj Nwaavjo I’tah Kukveni—Ancestral Footprints of the Grand Canyon National Monument is not only extremely popular but its protections are long overdue.

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As Armenian Fish Farming Expands, A Pristine Aquifer Is Drying Up

Yale E360

In recent decades, aquaculture has proliferated in Armenia’s Ararat Valley. The heightened use of water, combined with a warming climate and increased drought, has led to groundwater reserves shrinking by two-thirds, once-bountiful farms withering, and wells going dry.

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Open access: In conversation with Frontiers’ Dr Marie Souliere 

Frontiers

Joining us today is Dr Marie Soulière, senior publishing manager at Frontiers, who was elected as Council Member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) in 2020. In this interview, we delve into the challenges faced by open access publishers when it comes to publication ethics. Dr Soulière highlights the rising complexity of fraud, ranging from data manipulation to fake peer reviews, and the heightened scrutiny faced by open access publishers.

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Independence Conservancy Hosts Waste Tire Collection Events In Beaver, Washington Counties

PA Environment Daily

The Independence Conservancy will host three waste tire collection events in Beaver and Washington counties to provide an affordable way for vehicle owners to get rid of tires or wheels from cars and light trucks and other vehicles. All collections are held on Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. to Noon on-- -- September 16: Washington County , Mount Pleasant Twp.

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What's in Floodwaters?

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Super-heavy oxygen hints at problem with the laws of physics

New Scientist

An unprecedentedly heavy version of oxygen is significantly less stable than expected, which suggests a problem our understanding of the nuclear strong force

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At Long Last, the Vison of the Grand Canyon Tribal Coalition Is Realized

NRDC

The designation of the Baaj Nwaavjo I’tah Kukveni—Ancestral Footprints of the Grand Canyon National Monument is not only extremely popular but its protections are long overdue.

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Spreading Rock Dust on Farmland Has Potential to Draw Down Huge Sums of Carbon Dioxide

Yale E360

Spreading volcanic rock dust on cropland could help the world reach a key carbon removal goal, a new study finds.

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What Does It Take To Photograph A Bat Cave?

Cool Green Science

Longtime cave photographer Stephen Alvarez goes underground to document an endangered bat species on the rebound. The post What Does It Take To Photograph A Bat Cave? appeared first on Cool Green Science.

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Penn State Extension: Trees Can Give Downtown Commercial Areas A Competitive Advantage Over Big Box Stores

PA Environment Daily

By Vincent Cotrone, Urban Forestry Educator This article first appeared in the Penn State Extension Community Trees newsletter-- Across America, downtown commercial districts struggle to compete with big box stores and online shopping. For small downtowns to flourish economically and socially, they need to attract shoppers and residents by creating attractive, safe, walkable settings that people want to visit and spend time out of their cars.

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New Air-Conditioning Technology Could Be the Future of Cool

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Implant lets people type on virtual keyboards with just brain signals

New Scientist

A company called Synchron, backed by Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, may become the first to commercialise a brain implant that lets people control touchscreen devices using brain signals

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New York City Remains a Battleground for Illegal Ivory Trade

NRDC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announces new exhibit of confiscated ivory at the New York State Museum that educates the public about the harmful industry.

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Reefs made from culled trees can help kickstart sea life in threatened waters

Frontiers

By Mischa Dijkstra, Frontiers science writer One of the ‘tree-reefs’ being examined after five months in the Wadden Sea. Image credit: Jon Dickson Researchers have shown that structures made from culled pear trees sunk into soft-bottomed seas like the Dutch Wadden Sea provide excellent replacements for naturally occurring hard substrates, of which many have been lost due to human activities.