Sat.Nov 04, 2023 - Fri.Nov 10, 2023

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Ecosystems as Infrastructure: A New Way of Looking at Climate Resilience

Yale E360

Landscape architect Kate Orff works on rebuilding natural systems to help communities and cities reduce their climate risks. Places with interwoven ecological systems, she says, are more resilient and better able both to respond to emergencies and adapt for the future.

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The Best “I Voted” Stickers on the Internet: My Favorite Displays of Voting Energy, Diversity, and Pride

Union of Concerned Scientists

Voting is an important part of maintaining our democracy – and it feels even better when we receive a sticker to do it. While they might seem like a small token of participation, “I Voted” stickers help normalize voting as an expected social norm – political scientists have highlighted that people are more likely to vote when they think that others around them vote, too.

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Who Should Own Our Electric Utilities?

Legal Planet

Photo from Tony Webster at [link] This week voters in Maine rejected a ballot measure to implement a public takeover of the state’s two investor-owned utilities. The measure proposed acquiring the two investor-owned utilities that distribute 97% of Maine’s electricity and operating them as a new publicly-owned utility called Pine Tree Power, that would be governed by an elected board. 70% of Mainers voted to reject the measure and 30% supported it (as of this posting).

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Court Addresses Questions in Trespass to Try Title/Adverse Possession Suit

Energy & the Law

Fletcher v. Merritt resulted in several rulings on the proof required to prevail in a property dispute. Merritt filed a trespass to try title suit (actually a quiet title, which the court construed as TTT) against Fletcher for ownership of a 28.9 foot-wide strip separating their lots. In concluding that the evidence was legally and factually sufficient to support adverse possession in favor of Merritt the court clarified several aspects of Texas adverse possession and TTT law.

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The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

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Giant Sequoias Are in Big Trouble. How Best to Save Them?

Yale E360

California’s ancient sequoias — some of which have stood more than 1,000 years — are facing an existential threat from increasingly intense wildfires linked to climate change. But federal efforts to thin forests to reduce fire risks are drawing pushback from conservation groups.

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Climate Litigation and UN Climate Talks: An Important Symbiosis

Union of Concerned Scientists

Climate change, one of the defining challenges of our time, demands multifaceted approaches to drive action and accountability. Two central players in this arena are climate litigators and United Nations (UN) climate negotiators. While they may seem like separate pieces of the climate puzzle, they interact in a symbiotic and mutually reinforcing manner in the collective effort to combat global warming.

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Federal Receiver Allowed to Abandon Texas Pipeline

Energy & the Law

Securities and Exchange Commission v. The Heartland Group Ventures LLC et al. explains what a receiver under federal law has the right to do. Much like Nick Saban’s offense against a certain team, she can do just about anything she wants. The assets The SEC applied for appointment of a receiver for a group of Heartland companies. The entities’ assets included 403 oil and gas wells and 110 miles of gas gathering and transportation lines called the Palo Pinto Pipeline.

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After Salmon Kills, EPA Takes Aim at Toxic Chemical Issuing from Tires

Yale E360

The Environmental Protection Agency will review the use of a chemical found in tires that has been linked with the deaths of salmon on the U.S. West Coast.

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What Will Be the Real Consequences of an EPA Decision to List PFAS as Hazardous Substances Under CERCLA?

Law and Environment

Last week, Inside EPA (subscription required) reported that EPA will reopen CERCLA cleanups due to the presence of PFAS on a case-by-case basis. The article reported on the gnashing of teeth among the regulated community at the prospect of seeing a significant number of sites reopened. As a card-carrying member of the regulated community, I am prone to teeth-gnashing as well.

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Getting to Implementation

Legal Planet

This post is co-authored by CLEE Climate Policy Fellow, Hanna Payne In the arc of climate action, we are firmly in the era of implementation. As climate change accelerates, communities across the state are experiencing the effects of a changing climate. To avoid the worst of these impacts, it is critical that we rapidly implement actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build resilience to the effects of a changing climate.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Is Long COVID Real? Here Is What Tony Fauci Told Me

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Deforestation in Colombia Down 70 Percent So Far This Year

Yale E360

Deforestation in the Colombian Amazon is down 70 percent, year on year, through the first nine months of 2023, the government estimates.

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Why we need to bring stellar astrophysics into the real world

New Scientist

Explaining the structure and evolution of stars may seem as esoteric as can be, but there are many applications for this knowledge in our day-to-day lives, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

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New Report: Ontario Government can Improve GTHA Congestion by Reducing 407 ETR tolls for Trucks Instead of Paving the Greenbelt with Highway 413

Enviromental Defense

Report finds moving trucks to Hwy 407 would save approx. 80 minutes of travel time for truckers and remove 12-21,000 trucks per day from Hwy 401, making Hwy 413 unnecessary Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat – A new report released today, The Freight Escape: How to Get Trucks Off the 401 Without Blowing a Hole in the Greenbelt , finds that subsidizing the toll on the 407 ETR for truckers is a win-win solution

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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Understanding Consciousness Goes Beyond Exploring Brain Chemistry

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Greenland's Glaciers Melting Twice as Fast as They Were 20 Years Ago

Yale E360

Greenland's coastal glaciers are melting twice as rapidly as they were two decades ago, according to a study warning the glaciers have entered a new phase of rapid retreat.

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A second big bang? The radical idea rewriting dark matter’s origins

New Scientist

The enduring mystery of dark matter has led some physicists to propose that it was forged in a distinct moment of cosmic creation, potentially transforming our view of the early universe

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Could willow bark provide our next life-saving antiviral medicine?

Frontiers

by Angharad Brewer Gillham, Frontiers science writer Image/Shutterstock.com Scientists have found that specially processed samples of willow bark extract have an antiviral effect which isn’t seen in already known medical compounds from willow bark, such as salicylic acid, the precursor to modern aspirin. The extract worked against two common types of virus with very different structures, enteroviruses and coronaviruses, suggesting the potential for a new broad-spectrum antiviral to help us fight

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Diversity in Science Includes Cultural Dress

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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New York State Court Holds Upholds Local Law 97

Law Columbia

Last week, the New York State Supreme Court for New York County dismissed Glen Oaks Village Owners v. City of New York , a 2022 lawsuit brought by a group of cooperative apartment and other building owners seeking to invalidate Local Law 97 of 2019 , New York City’s building performance standard to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the City’s largest buildings.

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Crabs evolved to live away from the ocean up to 17 different times

New Scientist

Unlike most other animal groups that left the sea behind, crabs have done it many times throughout their evolutionary history – and some crab lineages have even reversed course back to the ocean

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US Forest Service: Sugar Bay Wildfire In Allegheny National Forest 100% Contained

PA Environment Daily

On November 9, the US Forest Service announced the 62-acre Sugar Bay Wildfire in Allegheny National Forest reached 100 percent containment. The fire was reported on November 6. Allegheny National Forest staff are actively engaged in establishing firelines and mitigating safety hazards. The Glade Volunteer Fire Department and the US Army Corps of Engineers are providing boat operators and boats to ferry wildland firefighters to the fire.

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Earth Just Had the Hottest 12-Month Span in Recorded History

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Sabin Center for Climate Change Law Submits Amicus Brief on Climate and Human Rights to Inter-American Court

Law Columbia

Sabin Center for Climate Change Law Submits Amicus Brief on Climate and Human Rights to Inter-American Court On Friday, November 3, 2023, the Sabin Center submitted an amicus curiae brief to the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in the matter of the Request for Advisory Opinion on climate law, human rights, and climate science. This submission responds to the Request for Advisory Opinion presented by the Republic of Colombia and the Republic of Chile, focusing on the intersection of the clima

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Twin ocean climate anomalies may trigger heat and drought in 2024

New Scientist

A strong El Niño in the Pacific Ocean is coinciding with a similarly strong climate pattern in the Indian Ocean, suggesting South-East Asia and Australia will soon experience heat, drought and wildfires

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Long-term Monitoring: The key to unlocking effective Marine Protected Area Management?

The Applied Ecologist

Christopher Honeyman talks us through recently published work which compared three Marine Protected Area (MPA) monitoring techniques, along with colleagues. Interestingly, each technique was shown to survey distinct groundfish community assemblages with varying levels of species diversity and richness. Therefore, combining multiple techniques may better allow managers to create the most comprehensive, effective and inclusive MPA monitoring regimes.

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'ChatGPT Detector' Catches AI-Generated Papers with Unprecedented Accuracy

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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National Scorecard Says Illinois Can Do Better on Transportation

NRDC

A new scorecard from NRDC shows that Illinois is trailing behind its neighbors in building a clean and equitable transportation system.

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Spine stimulator lets man with severe Parkinson's walk without falling

New Scientist

A man with Parkinson's disease who fell up to six times a day can now walk several kilometres without falling due to a device that electrically stimulates his spinal cord

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In the Florida Everglades, a Greenhouse Gas Emissions Hotspot

Inside Climate News

Drainage has exposed the fertile soils of the Everglades Agricultural Area, a region responsible for much of the nation’s sugar cane. By Amy Green ORLANDO, Fla.—It used to be the water spilled over Lake Okeechobee’s southern shore, flowing eventually into the sawgrass prairies of the Florida Everglades. For thousands of years the marsh vegetation flourished and died here in an endless cycle, the plant remains falling beneath the slow-coursing water to form a rich layer of organic soil called pea

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How Do Ultraprocessed Foods Affect Your Health?

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Now Is the Time to Get Transportation Right

NRDC

With record amounts of federal funding for transportation projects underway, a new NRDC scorecard ranks the states on their transportation priorities.

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Rainforest loss in South-East Asia could extend El Niño and La Niña

New Scientist

Climate models suggest that deforestation in Indonesia and Malaysia will cause feedback loops that contribute to longer El Niño and La Niña events, bringing more extreme impacts around the world