Sat.Apr 27, 2024 - Fri.May 03, 2024

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Is climate change accelerating after a record year of heat?

New Scientist

The record-breaking heat of 2023 has seen a rare disagreement break out between climate scientists, with some saying it shows Earth may have entered a new period of warming

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New Maps Show Where Tyson Foods Is Polluting Water

Union of Concerned Scientists

Tyson Foods, the largest meat and poultry producer in the United States, churns out billions of animal products each year. In addition to countless ribeye steaks and chicken nuggets, Tyson also produces contaminated wastewater—over 18.5 billion gallons in 2022 alone. This toxic stew includes animal parts and byproducts like blood and feces, pathogens like E. coli and Enterococcus , and nitrogen and phosphorus that can deplete oxygen in bodies of water.

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How the ICC is Using International Criminal Law to Prosecute Suspects of Eco Crimes

Legal Planet

There are many different ways that our global society has attempted to address environmental damage and climate change. We fund climate technology startups. We elect representatives that keep the climate in mind. We start nonprofits dedicated to reestablishing our collective sustainable relationships with earth systems. And we litigate in civil and federal courts at the national level when environmental rights have been violated.

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Increasingly Frequent Ocean Heat Waves Trigger Mass Die-Offs of Sealife, and Grief in Marine Scientists

Inside Climate News

Heat waves recently extended across nearly 30 percent of the world’s oceans, an expanse equivalent to the surface area of North America, Asia, Europe and Africa. By Bob Berwyn Over the past several years, the temperature of the Earth’s oceans have been spiking high enough to trigger numerous die-offs of marine species , killing millions of corals, fish, mammals, birds and plants.

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The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

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Autoimmune conditions linked to reactivated X chromosome genes

New Scientist

The inactivation of one copy of the X chromosome in female mammals may start to fail as they get older, which may be why women have a higher risk of autoimmune conditions such as lupus

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New California Legislation Would Help Us Better Understand Wildfire Health Impacts

Union of Concerned Scientists

Last year, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) made headlines across the country when we published a report demonstrating how worsening wildfires in the West are linked to the unrelenting, shameless emissions of the fossil fuel companies. While we hope that our science will bolster efforts to hold these companies accountable, the truth is that such accountability is necessary but insufficient.

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Longest-Ever COVID Infection Lasted More Than 600 Days

Scientific American

A Dutch man with lymphoma and other blood disorders was infected with the COVID-causing virus for nearly two years, during which time the pathogen evolved numerous mutations

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Can these awesome rocks become central Asia’s first UNESCO Geopark?

New Scientist

Long feted by fossil hunters and geologists, if UNESCO recognises the extraordinary rock formation at Madygen in Kyrgyzstan, it will soon be a player on the world stage

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After Decades of Disinformation, the US Finally Begins Regulating PFAS Chemicals

Union of Concerned Scientists

Earlier this month, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it would regulate two forms of PFAS contamination under Superfund laws reserved for “the nation’s worst hazardous waste sites.” EPA Administrator Michael Regan said the action will ensure that “polluters pay for the costs to clean up pollution threatening the health of communities.

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Statement in Response to Another Failed Carbon Capture Project 

Enviromental Defense

Statement from Julia Levin, Associate Director, National Climate Ottawa | Traditional, unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinaabeg People – Today Capital Power announced that they would not be pursuing carbon capture at the Genesee Generating Station, east of Edmonton Alberta, given the high costs and complexity of implementing the technology. The project was first proposed in 2021, and has already received government subsidies.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Do Insects Have an Inner Life? Animal Consciousness Needs a Rethink

Scientific American

A declaration signed by dozens of scientists says there is ‘a realistic possibility’ for elements of consciousness in reptiles, insects and molluscs

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The new drugs preventing allergic reactions to peanuts and other foods

New Scientist

Incredible results from trials of several new medications show they can prevent potentially deadly reactions to foods like peanuts, eggs and dairy - and may one day treat asthma

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Unforced Variations: May 2024

Real Climate

This month’s open thread on climate topics. Many eyes will be focused on whether April temperatures will be the 11th month in row of records… Note that we have updated the data and figures from the Nenana Ice Classic and Dawson City river ice break up pools (the nominal 13th and 5th earliest break-ups (or 15th and 4th, w.r.t. to the vernal equinox) in their respective records)).

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Premier Doug Ford’s Claim that Highway 413 Construction will Begin in 2025 is Wishful Thinking in View of Today’s Updates to Federal Impact Assessment

Enviromental Defense

Statement from Phil Pothen, Land Use and Land Development program manager Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat – In November 2022, Ontario Premier Doug Ford claimed that sprawl construction would be in progress on the Greenbelt by the end of 2023. Developers tried to evict tenants to make way for construction and survey trucks were on the ground in the Duffins Rouge Agricultural Preserve.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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Chatbots Have Thoroughly Infiltrated Scientific Publishing

Scientific American

One percent of scientific articles published in 2023 showed signs of generative AI’s potential involvement, according to a recent analysis

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Orangutan is first non-human seen treating wounds with medicinal plant

New Scientist

A male Sumatran orangutan chewed the leaves of a plant used in Indonesian traditional medicine and placed them on a wound on his face

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PA Oil & Gas Weekly Compliance Dashboard - April 20 to 26 - 2 Venting Shale Gas Wells; 16 More Conventional Abandoned Well Violations, 1 Shale Gas Well Abandonment

PA Environment Daily

From April 20 to 26, DEP’s Oil and Gas Compliance Database shows oil and gas inspectors filed 810 inspection entries and caught up posting earlier inspection reports. So far this year-- as of April 19 -- DEP reported-- -- NOVs Issued In Last Week: 85 conventional, 4 unconventional -- Year To Date - NOVs Issued: 2,983 conventional and 340 unconventional -- Enforcements 2024: 183 conventional and 45 unconventional -- Inspections Last Week: 353 conventional and 235 unconventional -- Year To Date -

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Meet the Most Famous Grizzly in the World

PBS Nature

Crowds await the arrival of Grizzly 399, the most famous bear in Grand Teton National Park. When she arrives, she surprises "her fans" with an exceptional litter of four cubs.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Wild Orangutan Uses Herbal Medicine to Treat His Wound

Scientific American

Researchers say this may be the first observation of a nonhuman animal purposefully treating a wound with a medicinal plant

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Being angry for just 8 minutes could increase risk of a heart attack

New Scientist

People who were asked to recall past events that made them angry experienced a change to their blood vessels that has been linked with heart attacks

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Passive tree diversity increase after intense forest exploitation? A matter of drought-tolerant and animal-dispersed species

The Applied Ecologist

Miriam Selwyn discusses their latest study’s findings, conducted with colleagues. Results find ca. 30 years of passive tree species diversity increase following intense forest management release. This is largely thought to be led by animal-dispersed and higher drought tolerant species in the context of increasing temperatures and decreasing precipitations.

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DEP Posted 73 Pages Of Permit-Related Notices In May 4 PA Bulletin

PA Environment Daily

Highlights of the environmental and energy notices in the May 4 PA Bulletin -- -- PA Oil & Gas Industrial Facilities: Permit Notices, Opportunities To Comment - May 4 [PaEN] -- The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the May 4 PA Bulletin inviting comments on a proposed Air Quality General Permit for Human or Animal Crematory Incinerators (GP-14).

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How Much Do Our Thoughts Shape Our Health?

Scientific American

The way we think about time, aging and sickness may influence our health, behavior and general well-being in surprising ways

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Astonishing images show how female Neanderthal may have looked

New Scientist

The skull of Shanidar Z was found in the Shanidar cave in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, and has been painstakingly put back together

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Climate Grief to Active Hope: SSC, Art Club, and Center for Environmental Justice Host Event to Transform Anxiety into Art

HumanNature

Written by Samantha Nordstrom Art Club event organizer Sidney Stadelmann shows event attendees how to start a wind chime craft from a repurposed can at the Nancy Richards Design Center on April 17. (Samantha Nordstrom | The Green Bulletin) The Student Sustainability Center, Art Club, and Center for Environmental Justice hosted a climate grief workshop focusing on transforming anxiety into art from 5-7 p.m. at the Nancy Richards Design Center on April 17.

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Colorado Lawmakers Must Approve Landmark Proposal to Fund Public Transit

NRDC

SB24-230 offers a tremendous opportunity to fund transit service through a fee on oil and gas production in Colorado—linking a key source of climate and ozone pollution with a key solution.

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Gas Stove Pollution Lingers in Homes for Hours Even outside the Kitchen

Scientific American

Gas stoves spew nitrogen dioxide at levels that frequently exceed those that are deemed safe by health organizations

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Carbon-negative cement can be made with a mineral that helps catch CO2

New Scientist

A process to dissolve the mineral olivine in acid could provide a plentiful, energy-efficient material for carbon-negative cement

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Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Holds PA Native Plant Sale May 11-12 In Montgomery County

PA Environment Daily

Visit Jacob Reiff Park on Saturday, May 11 and Sunday, May 12 to shop over 150 species of Pennsylvania native plants during the Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy’ s annual Native Plant Sale in Montgomery County. Enhance your outdoor spaces and protect your local environment with Pennsylvania native plants. Browse over 150 species of native flowering perennials, ferns, grasses, trees, and shrubs!

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Horses lived in the Americas for millions of years – new research helps paleontologists understand the fossils we’ve found and those that are missing from the record

Environmental News Bits

by Stephanie Killingsworth, University of Florida and Bruce J. MacFadden, University of Florida Many people assume that horses first came to the Americas when Spanish explorers brought them here about 500 years ago. In fact, recent research has confirmed a European origin for horses associated with humans in the American Southwest and Great Plains.

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Florida's Beef with Lab-Grown Meat Is Evidence-Free

Scientific American

Lobbyists’ and politicians’ campaigns against lab-grown meat appeal to emotion, not logic and reason

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The galactic anomalies hinting dark matter is weirder than we thought

New Scientist

Cosmological puzzles are tempting astronomers to rethink our simple picture of the universe – and ask whether dark matter is even stranger than we thought

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Gov. Shapiro Announces SBA Low-interest Loans Available For April 2024 Flood Survivors In Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Washington, Westmoreland Counties

PA Environment Daily

On May 2, Gov. Josh Shapiro announced the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) approved his recent request to make financial aid available to survivors after devastating flooding on April 11-12, 2024. SBA financial aid is available in Allegheny County as well as the surrounding counties of Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Washington and Westmoreland. Read more here.

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