July, 2023

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Record for hottest day ever recorded on Earth broken twice in a row

New Scientist

The average global air temperature recorded 2 metres above Earth’s surface was 17.18°C (62.92°F) on 4 July, the highest that has ever been recorded. The previous record was set the day before.

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Back to basics

Real Climate

You can tell how worried the climate deniers are by how many fields of science they have to trash to try and have people not see what’s happening. it will not have escaped most people’s notice that global temperatures are heading into uncharted territory. The proximate cause of this week’s headlines is the Climate Reanalyzer website at the U. Maine which provides a nice front end to the NOAA NCEP CFS forecast system and reanalysis and shows absolute daily temperatures in early July clearly excee

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An Attack on the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Plant Could Still be Catastrophic

Union of Concerned Scientists

Ukraine has accused Russia of planning to carry out a sabotage attack at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant that it has controlled since it seized it by force in March 2022. Although it reports this morning that this current threat is decreasing, the situation is fluid and the plant remains vulnerable to both accidents and attacks. While this ongoing crisis should not lead to panic, there is no cause for complacency either.

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Nature and the Pursuit of Happiness

Legal Planet

What is the “pursuit of happiness,” which the Declaration of Independence says is an inalienable right? It sounds like this is about freedom from governmental restrictions on your activities. So, in modern terms, it seemed to mean that the government can’t stop you from “doing your own thing.” But that can’t be right. The Declaration says we have an inalienable right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

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The Key to Sustainable Energy Optimization: A Data-Driven Approach for Manufacturing

Speaker: Kevin Kai Wong, President of Emergent Energy Solutions

In today's industrial landscape, the pursuit of sustainable energy optimization and decarbonization has become paramount. ♻️ Manufacturing corporations across the U.S. are facing the urgent need to align with decarbonization goals while enhancing efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive energy data poses a significant challenge for manufacturing managers striving to meet their targets. 📊 Join us for a practical webinar hosted by Kevin Kai Wong of Emergent Ene

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Native Bees Yield Hardier Flowers Than Honey Bees, Research Finds

Yale E360

Flowers pollinated by native bees produce fitter offspring than flowers pollinated by honey bees, according to a new study carried out in San Diego, California.

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Supercomputer Will Help Decide whether to Block the Sun

Scientific American

A new supercomputer is helping climate scientists determine whether injecting human-made, sun-blocking aerosols into the stratosphere would also alter thunderstorms and rainfall

More Trending

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What is happening in the Atlantic Ocean to the AMOC?

Real Climate

For various reasons I’m motivated to provide an update on my current thinking regarding the slowdown and tipping point of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). I attended a two-day AMOC session at the IUGG Conference the week before last, there’s been interesting new papers, and in the light of that I have been changing my views somewhat.

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The Global South is Leading the Way in Being A Nuclear Weapon Free Zone

Union of Concerned Scientists

An interview with María Antonieta Jáquez Huacuja from the Secretariat for Foreign Affairs of Mexico and Martha Mariana Mendoza Basulto from the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL). The United States maintains a nuclear weapons arsenal under the assumption this upholds national security. However, the United States, like many other countries with nuclear weapons, routinely chooses to prioritize nukes over human health and community wellbeing ev

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Solar Panels Are More Carbon-Intensive Than Experts Admit

Environmental Progress

Transport trucks transfer raw coal in pits as deep as 200 meters at the East Junggar Basin on July 4, 2018 in Changji Hui Autonomous Prefecture, Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous of China. The East Junggar Basin as one of the largest coalfield in Xinjiang has predicted coal reserves of 390 billion tons. (Photo by Liu Xin/China News Service/Visual China Group via Getty Images) By C.

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Tree Keepers: Where Sustaining the Forest Is a Tribal Tradition

Yale E360

The Menominee tribe of Wisconsin has sustainably harvested its woods for nearly 170 years, providing a model for foresters worldwide. Amid climate change and other threats to the forest, the tribe continues to follow a traditional code: Let the healthy trees keep growing.

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Great White Sharks Are Surging off Cape Cod

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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The Melting Glaciers of Svalbard Offer an Ominous Glimpse of More Warming to Come

Inside Climate News

New research reveals what one scientist called a “very stark image of climate change” as methane leaks from springs exposed by the glaciers’ retreat. By Lydia Larsen The remote arctic islands of Svalbard, Norway, the northernmost settlement in the world, have been called a canary in the coal mine of climate change, warming more than two times faster than other areas of the arctic and five to seven times faster than the rest of the planet.

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The Disinvestment in Centreville Continues

NRDC

A thorough and equitable plan to solve the flooding and sewage problems in Centreville must be developed to fund the necessary infrastructure repairs.

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Yes, Climate Change Worsened that Heatwave, Flood, Wildfire. Yes, Fossil Fuels are the Root Cause. Policymakers, Please Act and Stop the Madness.

Union of Concerned Scientists

The unprecedented spate of climate-driven catastrophes unfolding around the world right now is just terrifying. Extreme heat. Record-breaking floods. Cataclysmic wildfires. It’s understandable to sometimes feel overwhelmed and unsure what to do. Take a beat if you need to, but please don’t tune out or feel helpless! Because what we choose to do next will make all the difference in how the future unfolds, especially in the lifetimes of our children and grandchildren.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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The proposed Sustainable Jobs legislation does little for sustainability – This is how Canada can achieve a just transition

Enviromental Defense

The federal government recently released its proposed Sustainable Jobs Act , following up on its promise to pass just transition legislation. This means that the government has finally recognized its role in helping workers and communities impacted by the energy transition. There will be more energy jobs in the clean economy than in today’s fossil-fueled economy.

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The Color of Grass Roots: Diversifying the Climate Movement

Yale E360

Heather McTeer Toney is helping grassroots efforts to block the expansion of U.S. petrochemical facilities, most often in communities of color. They may not call themselves environmentalists, she says, but these communities are on the front lines of the global climate fight.

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Birds are using anti-bird spikes to make their nests

New Scientist

Magpies and crows have been seen making nests using spikes placed on buildings to deter birds from nesting

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DEP: Drought Task Force Maintains Drought Watch Status For All Of Pennsylvania

PA Environment Daily

On July 7, following a meeting of the Commonwealth Drought Task Force this week, the Department of Environmental Protection announced it will maintain a statewide drought watch. While not required, residents and non-farm businesses are encouraged to voluntarily conserve water by reducing their nonessential water use. At this time, 18 public water suppliers are asking for voluntary water conservation in their communities.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Migrant orangutans learn which foods are good to eat by watching the locals

Frontiers

By Mischa Dijkstra, Frontiers science writer An unflanged migrant orangutan male (on the left side) and an adolescent local orangutan female (on the right side) are peering at each other. Orangutan species: Pongo abelii. Image credit: Caroline Schuppli, SUAQ Project, [link] Researchers analyzed 30 years of observations on a total of 152 male migrant orangutans on Sumatra and Borneo and showed evidence that migrants learn about unfamiliar foods in their new home range by ‘peering’ at experienced

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Renewables and Storage Hold Their Own in the Texas Heat Dome

NRDC

No fossil fuels, no problem? Texas investments in wind and solar pay off, generating record-breaking renewable power to meet all-time high electricity demand during nearly 10-day heat dome—despite fossil fuel plant failures.

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Yes, Airline Flights Are Getting Bumpier: Here's Why

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Paris When It Sizzles: The City of Light Aims to Get Smart on Heat

Yale E360

With its zinc roofs and minimal tree cover, Paris was not built to handle the new era of extreme heat. Now, like other cities worldwide, it is looking at ways to adapt to rising temperatures — planting rooftop terraces, rethinking its pavements, and greening its boulevards.

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Is there life in the sea that hasn’t been discovered?

Environmental News Bits

Suzanne OConnell, Wesleyan University Curious Kids is a series for children of all ages. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, send it to curiouskidsus@theconversation.com. Is there life in the sea that hasn’t been discovered? – Haven W., age 12, McKinney, Texas Imagine going to a place on Earth where no … Continue reading Is there life in the sea that hasn’t been discovered?

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Penn State Hosts Online Solar Law Symposium Aug. 23

PA Environment Daily

The third annual Penn State Solar Law Symposium will be held virtually on August 23, from noon to 4:30 p.m., for attorneys and energy professionals. The event, co-sponsored by Penn State Extension, Penn State’s Center for Energy Law and Policy , and the Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law , is designed for those with beginning and intermediate levels of solar law knowledge.

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6 Great Reads on Birding, Fishing, Parks + More

Cool Green Science

We have your summer reading list sorted with these 6 great reads on birding, fishing, bats, national parks and more. The post 6 Great Reads on Birding, Fishing, Parks + More appeared first on Cool Green Science.

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Remembering Roger Payne, Maestro of the Seas

NRDC

Celebrated whale researcher, bio-acoustician, and conservation activist combined love of science, music, and the oceans in life-long battle to save the planet.

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Watch Baby Octopuses Hatch from a Surprising Deep-Sea Nursery

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Back from the Dead: New Hope for Resurrecting Extinct Plants

Yale E360

Armed with new technology, botanists are proposing what was once thought impossible: reviving long-lost plant species by using seeds from dried specimens in collections. The challenges remain daunting, but researchers are now searching for the best de-extinction candidates.

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Pennsylvania’s Dirty Dozen

Environmental News Bits

Download the report. Pennsylvania is one of America’s largest sources of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, most of which comes from the burning of fossil fuels and methane. Just 12 industrial facilities, power plants, mines and other large polluters — Pennsylvania’s “Dirty Dozen” — account for nearly one-fifth of the commonwealth’s total climate pollution.

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In Oregon Timber Country, a Town Buys the Surrounding Forests to Confront Climate-Driven Wildfires

Inside Climate News

A logger, forester and former mayor joined forces to help Butte Falls manage its forests to protect the town and build an economy supported by tourism rather than logging. By Grant Stringer This story is produced in partnership with Columbia Insight, an environmental news outlet covering the Columbia River Basin.

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Some sea snakes have re-evolved the ability to see more colours

New Scientist

Most snakes can see a limited range of colours, but the blue-banded sea snake has regained genes lost millions of years ago that may let them see ultraviolet and blue light

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Five Animals That Live in the Intertidal Zone

Ocean Conservancy

Living in the ocean is not easy. Marine animals face challenges every day–from evading predators to searching for food, the obstacles never stop. One particularly challenging ocean environment to live in: the intertidal zone. Love ocean content? Enter your email and never miss an update Sorry, but we failed to add you to the list. Please try again or contact 1.888.780.6763 Enter Your Email.loading Thanks for signing up for Ocean Conservancy emails.

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Even Lawyers Don't Understand Legalese, New Study Shows

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.