November, 2023

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Uncounted Emissions: The Hidden Cost of Fossil Fuel Exports

Yale E360

Oil, gas, and coal exports are not counted when countries tally their greenhouse gas emissions under the Paris Agreement. This allows wealthy nations to report progress on emissions reduction goals, while shipping their fossil fuels — and the pollution they produce — overseas.

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Electric Vehicle Sales Continue to Grow, Despite What Some Automakers Are Saying

Union of Concerned Scientists

The future of cars is electric. That’s not just what I think, it’s not just what is required to slow climate change, it’s what many of the world’s automakers have publicly stated. However, over the last month several automakers have said the transition from gasoline to electric vehicles (EVs) will need to slow down, in part citing demand. It’s important to understand two facts driving this flurry of pessimistic press.

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Science denial is still an issue ahead of COP28

Real Climate

It is 33 years now since the IPCC in its first report in 1990 concluded that it is “certain” that greenhouse gas emissions from human activities “will enhance the greenhouse effect, resulting on average in an additional warming of the Earth’s surface.” That has indeed happened as predicted, it has been confirmed by a zillion studies and has been scientific consensus for decades.

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DNA repair has been captured in a step-by-step molecular movie

New Scientist

Researchers have worked out how a protein called photolyase repairs DNA using light, and their discoveries could guide the development of light-based manufacturing technologies

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Implementing D.E.J.I. Strategies in Energy, Environment, and Transportation

Speaker: Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

Diversity, Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (DEJI) policies, programs, and initiatives are critically important as we move forward with public and private sector climate and sustainability goals and plans. Underserved and socially, economically, and racially disadvantaged communities bear the burden of pollution, higher energy costs, limited resources, and limited investments in the clean energy and transportation sectors.

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Is Long COVID Real? Here Is What Tony Fauci Told Me

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Leaked Letter Reveals Ontario Government Scheme to Recruit Small Town Mayors as Lackeys for Forced Sprawl

Enviromental Defense

Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat – Just weeks after revelations of impropriety forced the Ontario government to reverse its imposition of corrupt settlement boundary expansions on unwilling City and Regional governments, a leaked letter from Municipal Affairs Minister Paul Calandra suggests that the Premier and Cabinet ministers are doubling down and trying to make the mayors of lower-tier municipalities ac

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New Study Warns of an Imminent Spike of Planetary Warming and Deepens Divides Among Climate Scientists

Inside Climate News

James Hansen, the scientist who first sounded the climate alarm in Congress, sees a decrease in aerosol pollution driving a surge of warming and criticizes the U.N. climate science panel, drawing a backlash from other researchers. By Bob Berwyn During the past year, the needles on the climate dashboard for global ice melt, heatwaves, ocean temperatures , coral die-offs, floods and droughts all tilted far into the red warning zone.

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Could willow bark provide our next life-saving antiviral medicine?

Frontiers

by Angharad Brewer Gillham, Frontiers science writer Image/Shutterstock.com Scientists have found that specially processed samples of willow bark extract have an antiviral effect which isn’t seen in already known medical compounds from willow bark, such as salicylic acid, the precursor to modern aspirin. The extract worked against two common types of virus with very different structures, enteroviruses and coronaviruses, suggesting the potential for a new broad-spectrum antiviral to help us fight

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Earth passes 2°C of warming on hottest day ever recorded

New Scientist

The global average surface temperature was more than 2°C higher than pre-industrial levels on 17 November for the first time since records began, according to provisional data

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Diversity in Science Includes Cultural Dress

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Shaping a Resilient Future: Climate Impact on Vulnerable Populations

Speaker: Laurie Schoeman Director, Climate & Sustainability, Capital

As households and communities across the nation face challenges such as hurricanes, wildfires, drought, extreme heat and cold, and thawing permafrost and flooding, we are increasingly searching for ways to mitigate and prevent climate impacts. During this event, national climate and housing expert Laurie Schoeman will discuss topics including: The two paths for climate action: decarbonization and adaptation.

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New Report: Ontario Government can Improve GTHA Congestion by Reducing 407 ETR tolls for Trucks Instead of Paving the Greenbelt with Highway 413

Enviromental Defense

Report finds moving trucks to Hwy 407 would save approx. 80 minutes of travel time for truckers and remove 12-21,000 trucks per day from Hwy 401, making Hwy 413 unnecessary Toronto | Traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinaabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat – A new report released today, The Freight Escape: How to Get Trucks Off the 401 Without Blowing a Hole in the Greenbelt , finds that subsidizing the toll on the 407 ETR for truckers is a win-win solution

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Ecosystems as Infrastructure: A New Way of Looking at Climate Resilience

Yale E360

Landscape architect Kate Orff works on rebuilding natural systems to help communities and cities reduce their climate risks. Places with interwoven ecological systems, she says, are more resilient and better able both to respond to emergencies and adapt for the future.

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New York State Court Holds Upholds Local Law 97

Law Columbia

Last week, the New York State Supreme Court for New York County dismissed Glen Oaks Village Owners v. City of New York , a 2022 lawsuit brought by a group of cooperative apartment and other building owners seeking to invalidate Local Law 97 of 2019 , New York City’s building performance standard to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the City’s largest buildings.

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Fishing chimpanzees found to enjoy termites as a seasonal treat

Frontiers

by Angharad Brewer Gillham, Frontiers science writer Image/Seth Phillips Termites are a crucial source of nutrients for chimpanzees, who fish for them with tools, but they’re not always accessible. Now, researchers copying chimpanzee tools and techniques have shown that chimpanzees living in western Tanzania can only reliably fish for termites in the early wet season, when other foods are abundant.

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Sustainability at Retail

Sustainability impacts every nation, company, and person around the world. So much so that, in 2015, the United Nations (UN) issued a call for action by all countries to work toward sustainable development. In response to this and as part of a global Sustainability at Retail initiative, Shop! worked collaboratively with its global affiliates to address these critical issues in this white paper.

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Bits of an ancient planet called Theia may be buried in Earth’s mantle

New Scientist

Two strange, high-density blobs buried more than a kilometre underground may have come from the ancient world Theia, which is thought to have slammed into Earth to create the moon

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Understanding Consciousness Goes Beyond Exploring Brain Chemistry

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Even One More Oil and Gas Lease Sale in the Gulf of Mexico Is Too Many

NRDC

An expansion of offshore drilling would lock the region into decades of fossil fuel extraction at the expense of the climate, coastal communities, and marine life.

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As Climate Talks Near, Calls Mount for a ‘Phaseout’ of Fossil Fuels

Yale E360

With UN climate negotiations set for next month, a growing number of nations and business leaders are calling for a phaseout of fossil fuels. But with major fossil fuel expansion projects moving ahead around the globe, advocates of strong action face a daunting challenge.

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Censorship Industrial Complex, Part 2: Michael Shellenberger Testifies Before Congress

Environmental Progress

The Censorship-Industrial Complex, Part 2 U.S. and foreign government support for domestic censorship and disinformation, 2016 - 2022 Testimony by Michael Shellenberger to The House Select Subcommittee on the Weaponization of the Federal Government November 30, 2023 Chairman Jordan, Ranking Member Plaskett, and members of the Subcommittee thank you for inviting my testimony.

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From Toxic Leak to Cover-Up: Unravelling the Imperial Oil Scandal in Alberta’s Oil Sands

Enviromental Defense

A disastrous toxic spill in the tar sands In February 2023, 5.3 million litres of toxic industrial wastewater known as tailings spilled from Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine in the tar sands into the surrounding environment. Local Indigenous communities rely on the land and water for sustenance and cultural practices. Tar sands tailings “ponds,” store over 1.4 trillion litres of toxic wastewater from oil production.

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A second big bang? The radical idea rewriting dark matter’s origins

New Scientist

The enduring mystery of dark matter has led some physicists to propose that it was forged in a distinct moment of cosmic creation, potentially transforming our view of the early universe

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'ChatGPT Detector' Catches AI-Generated Papers with Unprecedented Accuracy

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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More than 100 Organizations Call for a Forest Accountability Framework

NRDC

At the start of COP28, civil society groups from around the world are urging countries to establish a Glasgow Declaration Accountability Framework (GDAF).

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Shifting Political Winds Threaten Progress on Europe’s Green Goals

Yale E360

Shaken by global instability and a populist backlash, European nations are retreating from plans to reduce greenhouse gases, promote sustainable farming practices, and boost biodiversity. Green advocates fear the EU will fail to meet its commitments under the Paris Agreement.

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Sabin Center for Climate Change Law Submits Amicus Brief on Climate and Human Rights to Inter-American Court

Law Columbia

Sabin Center for Climate Change Law Submits Amicus Brief on Climate and Human Rights to Inter-American Court On Friday, November 3, 2023, the Sabin Center submitted an amicus curiae brief to the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in the matter of the Request for Advisory Opinion on climate law, human rights, and climate science. This submission responds to the Request for Advisory Opinion presented by the Republic of Colombia and the Republic of Chile, focusing on the intersection of the clima

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New Research Makes it Harder to Kick The Climate Can Down the Road from COP28

Inside Climate News

Without immediate emissions cuts, global temperatures will breach the Paris Agreement’s goals sooner than expected, scientists say. ‘Despite decades of warnings, we are still heading in the wrong direction’ By Bob Berwyn Research released this week raises new questions about how much more Earth may warm, or cool, if and when human carbon dioxide emissions zero out.

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Crabs evolved to live away from the ocean up to 17 different times

New Scientist

Unlike most other animal groups that left the sea behind, crabs have done it many times throughout their evolutionary history – and some crab lineages have even reversed course back to the ocean

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Earth Just Had the Hottest 12-Month Span in Recorded History

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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DEP Issues Record 5,653 Notices Of Violation To Conventional Oil & Gas Operators So Far In 2023; ‘Culture Of Non-Compliance’ Continues

PA Environment Daily

The Department of Environmental Protection has issued a record 5,653 notices of violation to conventional oil and gas operators in 2023, with two months left in the year, according to DEP’s November 3, 2023 Weekly Workload Report. That’s 25% more than in 2021. On November 13, PA Environment Digest reported DEP has issued at least 435 notices of violation to 87 conventional oil and gas operators for abandoning their wells without plugging them so far in 2023, according to DEP’s Oil & Gas Comp

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Giant Sequoias Are in Big Trouble. How Best to Save Them?

Yale E360

California’s ancient sequoias — some of which have stood more than 1,000 years — are facing an existential threat from increasingly intense wildfires linked to climate change. But federal efforts to thin forests to reduce fire risks are drawing pushback from conservation groups.

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The Belvidere Plant's Transition to an EV Plant Has a Bright Future

NRDC

The United Auto Workers’ historic strike results in important benefits, including a path for reopening the Belvidere Assembly Plant in Illinois.

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What the Melting of Antarctic Ice Shelves Means for the Planet

Inside Climate News

A Q&A with Richard Alley, professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, on how melting at the South Pole could impact sea level rise. Interview by Steve Curwood, "Living on Earth" From our collaborating partner “Living on Earth,” public radio’s environmental news magazine , an interview by Host Steve Curwood with Penn State geologist Richard Alley.

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How excited should we be by signs of life spotted on alien worlds?

New Scientist

We keep spotting molecular “biosignatures” in the atmospheres of planets beyond Earth, but it isn't clear if any of them can provide definitive evidence that we’re not alone

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How Do Ultraprocessed Foods Affect Your Health?

Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.