Sat.Sep 18, 2021 - Fri.Sep 24, 2021

Extreme Heat Is a Killer. A New Federal Initiative Prioritizes Worker Health and Safety.

Union of Concerned Scientists

The White House has tasked OSHA with launching a multi-pronged initiative to protect workers exposed to extreme heat. That's great news -- but there's a rub. Climate Change extreme heat OSHA Priorities for the Biden Administration Too Hot to Work

Some Microeconomics of Extreme Heat Exposure in the United States

Environmental and Urban Economics

The Biden Administration has made an announcement that it seeks to protect outdoor workers from extreme heat exposure. What does the theory of compensating differentials in real estate markets and labor markets teach us about exposure to high temperatures. I maintain two assumptions. Assumption #1: The apartment rental market is perfectly competitive and an area's heat risk is common knowledge. If heat risk rises in a location, all market bidders are aware of this.

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Footprint Discovery Hints at Humans in the Americas More Than 20,000 Years Ago

Scientific American

Seeds found in fossilized tracks fuel new speculation about when—and how—people arrived. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Biology Paleontology Social Sciences Archaeology

2021 114

In Climate Talks, Plans to Keep Planet from Overheating Should Not Ignore Water

Circle of Blue

Carbon-reduction plans, if not well designed, can worsen water scarcity and pollution. Transmission lines in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, stretch to the horizon. Photo © J. Carl Ganter/Circle of Blue. Plans to reduce carbon emissions should take water into account.

Houston We Have a Problem: An Environmental Justice Analysis of Harmful Air Pollution from Industrial Fires

Union of Concerned Scientists

A UCS team looked closely at an industrial fire's health effects on a fenceline community. Science and Democracy air pollution chemical fire environmental justice Houston Texas

Amateur astronomers capture flash from asteroid impacting Jupiter

Physics World

Five amateur astronomers from South America and Europe have captured a burst of light on Jupiter that was the result of an asteroid crashing into the planet’s atmosphere. It is thought that the flash on 13 September – known as a meteor “bolide” – may have been created by a body tens of metres across.

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Toxin Levels Spike, Prompting Drinking Water Emergency in Northern California

Circle of Blue

Cyanotoxins in the state’s second-largest freshwater lake soared this month amid a hot, dry summer. Colorful blooms of cyanobacteria, also called blue-green algae, paint the nearshore waters of Clear Lake, California’s second-largest freshwater lake.

2014 114

As Extreme Heat Challenges Our Outdoor Workers, White House Announcement Will Save Lives

Union of Concerned Scientists

A national heat safety standard for workers is long overdue. Climate Change Science and Democracy environmental justice extreme heat LIHEAP White House Worker safety

As Italy’s Glaciers Recede, a Stunning World of Ice Is Being Lost

Yale E360

Photographer Luigi Avantaggiato has trekked high into the Italian Alps to document the melting of some of the world’s most studied glaciers. His images track the glaciers’ increasingly rapid retreat and capture the stark beauty of a land in transition as the ice disappears. Read more on E360

2021 114

Agroecology Is the Solution to World Hunger

Scientific American

Millions of farmers are growing and sharing food in ways that enhance nutrition, biodiversity and quality of life. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Environment Agriculture Ecology Food

2021 114

Head-mounted magnetic device shrinks brain tumour

Physics World

A team of US-based researchers has used an innovative head-mounted device to shrink a brain tumour – potentially paving the way for a powerful new non-invasive therapy for glioblastoma.

Three Reasons the House Reconciliation Bill Is Good News for Flood Resilience and Communities

Union of Concerned Scientists

Climate Resilience Analyst Shana Udvardy examines part of the budget reconciliation bill that would help bolster our flood resilience in the United States. Here are three reasons why it should pass.

WHAT DRIVES YOU?

Cleannovate

I always marvel at ants and bees. These hardworkers put their best foot forward any day. They ‘slave’ their hearts out day in day out. But are they aware that they are planning for a better tomorrow? Probably yes. What’s to be enjoyed later requires sweat to build today. Sure, their commitment to work looks laborious and sounds like druggery (repetitive and unexciting). But their focus is razor sharp. They may stumble and fall but the direction is always forward.

2021 109

Is There a Thing, or a Relationship between Things, at the Bottom of Things?

Scientific American

Quantum mechanics inspires us to speculate that interactions between entities, not entities in themselves, are fundamental to reality. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Space & Physics Quantum Physics

2021 114

Building a quantum future

Physics World

Construction will soon be starting on the world’s first national laboratory to be dedicated to quantum computing.

2023 113

Congress and Reconciliation: Why This New Clean Energy Program Matters

Union of Concerned Scientists

With its passage out of a key committee in the House of Representatives last week, the Clean Electricity Performance Program (CEPP) is a step closer to reality, as part of the powerful budget reconciliation bill (the Build Back Better Act).

Plastic Pollution is like a Slow-Motion Oil Spill

Ocean Conservancy

When we think of our ocean’s biggest catastrophes, we tend to focus on specific events. I remember watching in horror as oil spewed into the Gulf of Mexico from the BP Deepwater Horizon , just two decades after the catastrophic Exxon Valdez oil spill spread across Prince William Sound in Alaska.

Astronomers Should be Willing to Look Closer at Weird Objects in the Sky

Scientific American

The Galileo Project seeks to train telescopes on unidentified aerial phenomena. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Space & Physics Extraterrestrial Life

2021 114

Ultralow-frequency neuromodulation safely relieves chronic pain

Physics World

Chronic pain, classified as persistent pain that lasts longer than three to six months, remains an area of considerable unmet medical need. A new treatment that uses electrodes to deliver alternating pulses of ultralow-frequency (ULF) current could help address this need.

POSea 2021 Conference: Beyond the #Hashtag

Union of Concerned Scientists

Science Network guest blogger Jasmin Graham announces the inaugural POSea Conference October 1-3, 2021, online only. For BIPOC folks in marine sciences, conservation, and policy, and their allies--registration link in post.

2021 139

Human whistled languages may offer model for how to study dolphin communication

Frontier Sin

By Peter Rejcek, science writer. Image credit: Ricardo Canino / Shutterstock. More than 80 cultures still use whistled language to communicate over long distances by simplifying words, syllable by syllable, into whistled melodies.

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How Music Can Literally Heal the Heart

Scientific American

Its structural attributes and physiological effects make it an ideal tool for learning cardiology; studying heart-brain interactions; and dispensing neuro-cardiac therapy. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Health Medicine

2021 114

New ‘time lens’ could boost single-photon imaging technique

Physics World

A new “time lens” that can magnify the difference in arrival times between individual photons within an ultra-short pulse has been developed by researchers in the US.

Congress Must Provide a Lifeline to Energy Workers and Communities in the $3.5-Trillion Build Back Better Package

Union of Concerned Scientists

For those following the intense negotiations on Capitol Hill, I don’t have to summarize the importance of passing the Build Back Better Act budget reconciliation package alongside the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to meet such critical challenges as strengthening the social safety net and addressing climate change.

Spatial Equilibrium and Haitian Immigration to the U.S

Environmental and Urban Economics

Politico reports on t he policy challenge that the Biden Administration faces. There are thousands of Haitian immigrants living in squalid conditions under the Del Rio International Bridge. A dynamic incentives issue arises. If the Biden Administration engages in humane policies to help these immigrants then this will attract more immigrants to move to the area as they will anticipate that they will be treated well.

A Vaccine against Poison Ivy Misery Is in the Works as Scientists Also Explore New Treatment Paths

Scientific American

Standard remedies offer little relief for the itchy rash caused by the plant, but researchers have found promising clues in the immune system. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. The Science of Health Health Medicine Vaccines

2021 112

Free and open-source software is driving physics forwards

Physics World

In this episode of the Physics World Stories podcast you will hear from scientists and software engineers at the vanguard of developing free and open-source software for physics research.

Can the World’s Most Polluting Heavy Industries Decarbonize?

Yale E360

The production of steel, cement, and ammonia together emit about one-fifth of all human-caused CO2. Technologies are emerging that promise to decarbonize these problem industries, but analysts warn that big challenges remain before the processes can be cleaned up. Read more on E360

What’s Up With Water – September 20, 2021

Circle of Blue

Transcript. Welcome to “What’s Up With Water,” your need-to-know news of the world’s water from Circle of Blue. I’m Eileen Wray-McCann. In Canada, an Indigenous community is celebrating the arrival of clean drinking water.

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Winged Microchips Glide like Tree Seeds

Scientific American

The tiny sensors could gather and transmit environmental data as they drift through the air. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Environment Pollution Technology Aerospace Engineering

Car passengers could soon listen to personalized audio using a new acoustic algorithm

Physics World

Multiple occupants of a car cabin could soon listen to different audio programmes without the need for headphones, thanks to an acoustic algorithm developed by researchers at the carmaker Stellantis and France’s Le Mans University.

If You Do Something You Love, You are Bound to Succeed

Frontier Sin

Author: Emma Phipps, Journal Specialist. Dr. Vidya Athreya is an ecologist who works for the Wildlife Conservation Society and Centre for Wildlife Studies in India and focuses mainly on human-wildlife interaction.

The Love Stories of Sleepy Lizards

Cool Green Science

“What’s that on the road?” I wonder out loud, squinting at the dark, oblong shape in the center of the red dirt track. A tree root? A rusted tail-pipe? A weird rock? As we slow down, I recognize the strange… The post The Love Stories of Sleepy Lizards appeared first on Cool Green Science.

China Says It Will Stop Financing Coal Power Abroad

Scientific American

The announcement came as the U.S. promised quadruple its international climate finance contributions. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Environment Climate Change Fossil Fuels