June, 2021

Can the US Survive California’s Drought?

Union of Concerned Scientists

California's drought is a national and international crisis. Climate Change California California drought climate change impacts disadvantaged communities Drought groundwater Sustainable Groundwater Management Act

Natural Protectors: Kenyan Women Step Up to Save a Forest

Yale E360

Only a few years ago, Samburu women in northern Kenya were cutting down firewood in the Kirisia forest and burning it to make charcoal. Now, those same women are directly involved in managing the forest, using it sustainably and reporting any illegal activity to authorities. Read more on E360

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How Dangerous Is the Delta Variant, and Will It Cause a COVID Surge in the U.S.?

Scientific American

A new, more transmissible form of SARS-CoV-2 is rapidly spreading in the country and poses a threat to unvaccinated and partially vaccinated people. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Health Public Health

2021 114

Solar device generates electricity and desalinates water with no waste brine

Physics World

A device that can generate electricity while desalinating seawater has been developed by researchers in Saudi Arabia and China, who claim that their new system is highly efficient at performing both tasks.

Four Facts about Soaring Consumer Food Prices

IMFBlog

By Christian Bogmans , Andrea Pescatori , and Ervin Prifti. Rising world food prices for producers are making headlines and causing concerns among the public.

5 Facts About the Fabulous Parrotfish

Ocean Conservancy

There’s a rainbow of life blossoming just beneath our ocean’s surface. From the vibrant reefs of the South Pacific to the dazzling shells nestled on Florida’s beaches, you don’t have to go far to realize just how captivatingly colorful and diverse our ocean truly is.

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More Trending

As a Hot, Dry Summer Begins in California, More Water Wells Are Failing

Circle of Blue

Government agencies and nonprofit groups are preparing for difficult months ahead. Guillermina Andrade (left) and Vicente Tapia filled barrels from a water depot outside the East Porterville, California, fire station.

2014 114

See the Highest-Resolution Atomic Image Ever Captured

Scientific American

Scientists achieved a record level of visual detail with an imaging technique that could help develop future electronics and better batteries. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Tech Computing Electronics Physics

2021 114

Artificial intelligence can spot holes in the Sun’s corona

Physics World

Many Suns: this image taken by the Solar Dynamic Observatory shows the Sun at seven different EUV wavelengths (coloured stripes) and magnetic field information (grey scale stripe). Coronal holes are indicated by red contour lines. Courtesy: Jarolim et al. 2021).

As Climate Warms, a Rearrangement of World’s Plant Life Looms

Yale E360

Previous periods of rapid warming millions of years ago drastically altered plants and forests on Earth. Now, scientists see the beginnings of a more sudden, disruptive rearrangement of the world’s flora — a trend that will intensify if greenhouse gas emissions are not reined in. Read more on E360

Glyphosate pesticides persist for years in wild plants and cause flower infertility

Frontier Sin

By Peter Rejcek, science writer. Flower of prickly rose, Rosa acicularis. Image credit: BSG_1974 / Shutterstock.com. Glyphosate is an herbicide commonly used in forestry operations throughout British Columbia, Canada.

Plug In or Gas Up? Why Driving on Electricity is Better than Gasoline

Union of Concerned Scientists

Electricity power plant emissions data and the latest assessments of fuel emissions and vehicle efficiency show 97 percent of people in the US live where driving an EV would produce fewer emissions than a 50 mpg gasoline car. Transportation electric vehicle EVs

Announcing the 2021 Photo Contest Winners

Ocean Conservancy

Thank you for taking the time to enter your photographs and vote for your favorites during our 2021 Photo Contest this summer. I am blown away by the entries and I hope you enjoyed seeing all the incredible submissions we received from around the world. Love our content?

2021 112

Miami Building Collapse Could Profoundly Change Engineering

Scientific American

To pin down causes, investigators will likely gather original drawings of the building’s design, test the structure’s remains and run simulations of how it withstood forces. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Tech Engineering

2021 114

Huge Oort Cloud object has been spotted entering the solar system

Physics World

Astronomers sifting through data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) have spotted a large Oort Cloud object approaching the outer regions of the solar system.

2023 114

Amid Troubles for Fossil Fuels, Has the Era of ‘Peak Oil’ Arrived?

Yale E360

For years, analysts have predicted that rising world oil consumption would peak and start declining in the coming decades. But with a recent string of setbacks for big oil companies and the rapid advance of electric vehicles, some now say that “peak oil” is already here. Read more on E360

Breakthrough study shows defining traits are forged the moment we’re born

Frontier Sin

By Suzanna Burgelman, Frontiers science writer. Image: Oleksii Synelnykov/Shutterstock. A new study published by the open access publisher Frontiers is the first to research the link between functional brain network connectivity and behavioral temperament in newborns and one-month-old babies.

Undercutting Climate Goals, Biden Administration Greenlights Oil Drilling in Alaska

Union of Concerned Scientists

Common sense says that you cannot approve massive oil drilling projects if you want to swiftly reach net-zero emissions. Climate Change Alaska Department of the Interior

New Climate Research From a Year-Long Arctic Expedition Raises an Ozone Alarm in the High North

Inside Climate News

Warming of the surface of the Arctic is matched by a colder polar vortex high in the atmosphere, which is speeding the breakdown of the Earth’s shield against ultraviolet rays.

Ozone 113

Unexpected: Desert Plants Are Struggling in Higher Heat

Scientific American

Scientists say even the toughest vegetation cannot tolerate today’s heat waves. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Sustainability Climate Environment

2021 114

Indirect 3D printing creates intricate bioscaffolds for bone and tissue regrowth

Physics World

Researchers in fields such as tissue engineering and biomedical device development are increasingly harnessing the countless applications that 3D printing of bioscaffolds has unlocked.

Europe’s Drive to Slash Plastic Waste Moves Into High Gear

Yale E360

As part of a broader effort to create a circular economy that reduces waste and greenhouse gas emissions, the EU will ban a host of throwaway plastic items next month and is creating an expansive and lucrative market for recycled plastics. Read more on E360

Amid Dire Colorado River Outlook, States Plan to Tap Their Lake Mead Savings Accounts

Circle of Blue

This year and next, Arizona and California intend to draw on water they banked in the big reservoir, even as water levels drop. Lake Mead, the largest reservoir on the Colorado River, is a centerpiece for water supplies in Arizona, California, and Nevada.

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Tyranny of the Minority? — The Filibuster: Democracy at Risk

Union of Concerned Scientists

We must abolish the capacity of the Senate to filibuster questions of civil rights and democracy once and for all. Science and Democracy filibuster For the People Act John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act Voting rights

2021 264

Confidence Among Renewable Energy Investors at an All-Time High: Report

Environmental Leader

A new analysis released recently by the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE) finds that confidence among both renewable energy investors and developers is at an all-time high.

Unprecedented Heat Wave in Pacific Northwest Driven by Climate Change

Scientific American

Pacific Ocean cyclones are pumping up the high pressure system roasting the region. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Sustainability Climate

Ocean 114

Caution needed when testing Einstein’s general relativity using gravitational waves

Physics World

Physicists should be wary of data from gravitational-wave observatories that appear to contradict Einstein’s general theory of relativity. That is the message from researchers in the UK, who have analysed how errors accumulate when combining the results from multiple black-hole mergers.

Yellowstone and Warming: An Iconic Park Faces Startling Changes

Yale E360

A new report details global warming’s impact on Yellowstone Park, changes that have begun to fundamentally alter its famed ecosystem and threaten everything from its forests to Old Faithful geyser. Such troubling shifts are occurring in national parks across the U.S. Read more on E360

2021 113

A Proposal to Scale Up Global Carbon Pricing

IMFBlog

By Vitor Gaspar and Ian Parry. Between one quarter and one half. That’s how much carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases must fall over the next decade to keep alive the goal of restricting global warming to below 2°C.

Scientists Cannot Sit Comfortably Around Police Violence. We Have a Role in Helping End this Epidemic.

Union of Concerned Scientists

The lack of a comprehensive and easily accessible federal database to track and publicly report fatal encounters with the police, excessive use of force, and other policing interactions has created a blind spot for police reform and accountability.

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US Electric Vehicle Sales up 329% in May 2021

Environmental Leader

The principle of mutually beneficial cooperation and partnership between technologies is alive and well as electric vehicle (EV) sales and corresponding EV charge infrastructure spur each other on. The post US Electric Vehicle Sales up 329% in May 2021 appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

Science Should Not Try to Absorb Religion and Other Ways of Knowing

Scientific American

Our diverse ways of seeing reality will never, and should never, meld into a monolithic worldview. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. The Sciences Policy & Ethics

2021 114

Novel brachytherapy device treats eye cancer with intensity-modulated radiation

Physics World

“That may be one of the reasons why people in the medical physics world are interested in getting a conformal brachytherapy treatment for the eye.”.

How Returning Lands to Native Tribes Is Helping Protect Nature

Yale E360

From California to Maine, land is being given back to Native American tribes who are committing to managing it for conservation. Some tribes are using traditional knowledge, from how to support wildlife to the use of prescribed fires, to protect their ancestral grounds. Read more on E360