September, 2021

Hurricane Ida Shows Why We Urgently Need Bold, Just and Equitable Climate Action

Union of Concerned Scientists

More catastrophic storms are coming. Climate Change climate change Hurricane Ida

Some Microeconomics of Extreme Heat Exposure in the United States

Environmental and Urban Economics

The Biden Administration has made an announcement that it seeks to protect outdoor workers from extreme heat exposure. What does the theory of compensating differentials in real estate markets and labor markets teach us about exposure to high temperatures. I maintain two assumptions. Assumption #1: The apartment rental market is perfectly competitive and an area's heat risk is common knowledge. If heat risk rises in a location, all market bidders are aware of this.

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Why We Need to Upgrade Our Face Masks--and Where to Get Them

Scientific American

High-quality respirators such as N95s and K95s are now widely available and provide the best protection against COVID, according to experts. Why aren’t more people wearing them? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Health Public Health

2021 114

As the Climate Bakes, Turkey Faces a Future Without Water

Yale E360

No nation in the Mediterranean region has been hit harder by climate change than Turkey. But as heat and drought intensify, Turkey is doubling down on large-scale agriculture and development and spurring a water-supply crisis that is expected to get much worse. Read more on E360

Wind, Solar Power Help Grow US Renewable Energy Use

Environmental Leader

Wind and Solar sources help continue growth in US renewable energy use. The post Wind, Solar Power Help Grow US Renewable Energy Use appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader. Energy Management Solar & Renewable Energy

In Climate Talks, Plans to Keep Planet from Overheating Should Not Ignore Water

Circle of Blue

Carbon-reduction plans, if not well designed, can worsen water scarcity and pollution. Transmission lines in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, stretch to the horizon. Photo © J. Carl Ganter/Circle of Blue. Plans to reduce carbon emissions should take water into account.

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Life beyond the Nobel: Takaaki Kajita and the hunt for gravitational waves

Physics World

For the past half a century, Japan has led the world in neutrino science. In the 1980s the Japanese physicist Masatoshi Koshiba masterminded the construction of a huge neutrino detector located 1000 m underground in a lead and zinc mine in Japan in Hida, Gifu Prefecture.

2008 111

How to Search for Life as We Don't Know It

Scientific American

Much of astrobiology is focused on looking for organisms with chemistry similar to ours—but there could well be other kinds. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Space & Physics Extraterrestrial Life

2021 114

As Italy’s Glaciers Recede, a Stunning World of Ice Is Being Lost

Yale E360

Photographer Luigi Avantaggiato has trekked high into the Italian Alps to document the melting of some of the world’s most studied glaciers. His images track the glaciers’ increasingly rapid retreat and capture the stark beauty of a land in transition as the ice disappears. Read more on E360

2021 114

The Rate of Global Warming During Next 25 Years Could Be Double What it Was In The Previous 50, a Renowned Climate Scientist Warns

Inside Climate News

Former NASA climate scientist James Hansen urged Congress decades ago to act on climate change. Now he says he expects reduced aerosol pollution to lead to a steep temperature rise.

Toxin Levels Spike, Prompting Drinking Water Emergency in Northern California

Circle of Blue

Cyanotoxins in the state’s second-largest freshwater lake soared this month amid a hot, dry summer. Colorful blooms of cyanobacteria, also called blue-green algae, paint the nearshore waters of Clear Lake, California’s second-largest freshwater lake.

2014 114

Extreme Heat Is a Killer. A New Federal Initiative Prioritizes Worker Health and Safety.

Union of Concerned Scientists

The White House has tasked OSHA with launching a multi-pronged initiative to protect workers exposed to extreme heat. That's great news -- but there's a rub. Climate Change extreme heat OSHA Priorities for the Biden Administration Too Hot to Work

Head-mounted magnetic device shrinks brain tumour

Physics World

A team of US-based researchers has used an innovative head-mounted device to shrink a brain tumour – potentially paving the way for a powerful new non-invasive therapy for glioblastoma.

Even Mild Cases of COVID May Leave a Mark on the Brain

Scientific American

The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the potential long-term effects of COVID-19. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Health Epidemiology

2021 114

On the Klamath, Dam Removal May Come Too Late to Save the Salmon

Yale E360

The upcoming demolition of four Klamath River dams was seen as an ecological triumph that would help restore the river’s beleaguered salmon. But after a record drought and wildfire this summer, many are worried the salmon could be all but gone before the dams come down Read more on E360

2021 111

Living at high altitudes may lower chance of having a deadly stroke

Frontier Sin

By Conn Hastings, science writer. A town in the Ecuadorian Andes mountains. Image: ireneuke/Shutterstock.com. Researchers in Ecuador are the first to investigate the risk of stroke-related death and hospitalization in people living at four different altitude ranges.

2001 110

Florida’s Majestic Manatees Are Starving to Death

Inside Climate News

Deprived of once plentiful seagrass, more than 900 have died this year. Some experts contend they were taken off the endangered species list prematurely. By Amy Green ORLANDO, Fla.—The The manatee was too weak to swim.

A Functioning Democracy Focuses on Funding Priorities, Not Whether to Defund the Government

Union of Concerned Scientists

There are real-world consequences for this political gameplaying – including for science and scientists. Science and Democracy government shutdown

Bose-Einstein condensates hit record low temperature

Physics World

A new way of controlling the expansion of matter in a freely-falling Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) has produced the coldest effective temperature ever measured: 38 pK (10 -12 K) above absolute zero.

A Plot Twist for Climate Change, the Power of Occam's Razor, and Other New Books

Scientific American

Recommendations from the editors of Scientific American. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Recommended Environment Social Sciences Arts

Why Saving World’s Peatlands Can Help Stabilize the Climate

Yale E360

Peatlands make up 3 percent of the earth’s landscape, yet absorb large amounts of carbon and harbor surprising biodiversity. Although peat bogs and fens are under increasing environmental threat, efforts to protect and restore these ecosystems are gathering momentum. Read more on E360

2021 113

Five Nobel Prize winners publish scientific article collection for children

Frontier Sin

The Nobel Collection of free scientific articles for next generation of scientists goes live. Young people everywhere now have access to a free collection of scientific articles written by winners of science’s most coveted honor, the Nobel Prize.

2004 114

‘The Opportunity Is Now’: Water Advocates View Upcoming UN Climate Conference as Moment of Relevance

Circle of Blue

Water was overlooked in past global climate talks. Advocates are focusing on the Glasgow meeting to highlight water’s indispensable climate role. Demonstrators took to the streets at the 2009 global climate convention in Copenhagen. Photo © J. Carl Ganter/Circle of Blue.

3 Tips for Getting Started in Science Advocacy as an Early Career Scientist

Union of Concerned Scientists

It's September–or as we know it at UCS, Early Career Scientist Month! Melissa Varga provides some wise and informed advice about how to be an effective advocate, for those just beginning their careers in science.

2021 216

Building a quantum future

Physics World

Construction will soon be starting on the world’s first national laboratory to be dedicated to quantum computing.

2023 112

Footprint Discovery Hints at Humans in the Americas More Than 20,000 Years Ago

Scientific American

Seeds found in fossilized tracks fuel new speculation about when—and how—people arrived. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Biology Paleontology Social Sciences Archaeology

2021 114

How Adding Rock Dust to Soil Can Help Get Carbon into the Ground

Yale E360

Researchers are finding that when pulverized rock is applied to agricultural fields, the soil pulls far more carbon from the air and crop yields increase. More studies are underway, but some scientists say this method shows significant benefits for farmers and the climate. Read more on E360

2021 114

WHAT DRIVES YOU?

Cleannovate

I always marvel at ants and bees. These hardworkers put their best foot forward any day. They ‘slave’ their hearts out day in day out. But are they aware that they are planning for a better tomorrow? Probably yes. What’s to be enjoyed later requires sweat to build today. Sure, their commitment to work looks laborious and sounds like druggery (repetitive and unexciting). But their focus is razor sharp. They may stumble and fall but the direction is always forward.

2021 109

Regular exercise may lower risk of developing anxiety by almost 60%

Frontier Sin

By Colm Gorey, Frontiers science writer. Image: BGStock72/Shutterstock.com. The findings of a study published with Frontiers suggests that those who engage in regular exercise may lower their risk of developing anxiety by almost 60%.

2010 110

Houston We Have a Problem: An Environmental Justice Analysis of Harmful Air Pollution from Industrial Fires

Union of Concerned Scientists

A UCS team looked closely at an industrial fire's health effects on a fenceline community. Science and Democracy air pollution chemical fire environmental justice Houston Texas

New dawn for South African radioastronomy as major telescope nears completion

Physics World

A $25m radio telescope in South Africa that is dedicated to observing the early universe is expected to be complete early next year.

Why the Term 'JEDI' Is Problematic for Describing Programs That Promote Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Scientific American

They’re meant to be heroes within the Star Wars universe, but the Jedi are inappropriate symbols for justice work. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Social Sciences Inequality

2021 114

Beyond Extinction: A New Emphasis on Species Recovery

Yale E360

Scientists have long drawn up a Red List to alert officials about wildlife and plant species threatened with extinction. Now some say it’s time to flip the script and create a “green status” category that identifies how to bring these species back to sustainable levels. Read more on E360

2021 114

As Drought Grips American West, Irrigation Becomes Selling Point for Michigan

Circle of Blue

As Drought Grips American West, Irrigation Becomes Selling Point for Michigan. Michigan farmers irrigate with 187 billion gallons of groundwater a year. Is the state prepared for more? Michigan counts nearly 11,000 agricultural wells, 3,800 of them installed from 2010 to 2020.

2009 106