Wed.Nov 24, 2021

After COP26 – Wasted Time or Time Well-Spent?

Union of Concerned Scientists

People blocking progress need to get out of the way. Science Communication climate-change

Waste 229

Robotic exosuit uses ultrasound imaging to provide personalized walking assistance

Physics World

Wearable robotic systems have great potential for assisting locomotion during clinical rehabilitation, as well as use in recreation and to ease demanding occupational tasks.

2021 95
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Visualizing Air Quality with BreezoMeter's Pollution Heatmaps

Breezometer

Our color-coded pollution heatmaps are one of BreezoMeter’s best-loved features and have always been a key part of what we do: Highly visual representations of air quality in a way that anyone can understand and act upon.

NASA launches first-of-a-kind DART mission to deflect asteroid

Physics World

NASA has launched a mission to test whether it is possible to deflect an asteroid using “kinetic impact”.

2024 91

Biden taps the Strategic Petroleum Reserve – What is it? Where did it come from? And does the US still need it?

Environmental News Bits

by Scott L. Montgomery, University of Washington President Joe Biden ordered a release of oil from its Strategic Petroleum Reserve on Nov. 23, 2021, as a part of a coordinated effort with five other countries to tamp down rising fuel prices. The U.S.

2021 87

How Domestic Violence is a Threat to Economic Development

IMFBlog

By Rasmane Ouedraogo and David Stenzel. Stopping violence against women is not only a moral imperative, new evidence shows that it can help the economy.

Why the oil industry’s pivot to carbon capture and storage – while it keeps on drilling – isn’t a climate change solution

Environmental News Bits

by June Sekera, The New School and Neva Goodwin, Tufts University After decades of sowing doubt about climate change and its causes, the fossil fuel industry is now shifting to a new strategy: presenting itself as the source of solutions.

More Trending

More than 20 ill after officials failed to warn about sewage-contaminated oysters

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story in The Hill. More than 20 people fell ill after Maryland officials failed to warn residents about oysters that were contaminated by raw sewage. Between Oct. 28 and Oct.

2021 82

When Did Life Start in the Universe?

Scientific American

Interstellar xenia, or the welcoming of cosmic strangers, could solve this mystery. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Space & Physics Astronomy

2021 113

Climate Adaptation Scientists of Tomorrow Program

Environmental News Bits

Apply by December 20.

Albatross 'Divorce' Rate Rises as the Ocean Warms

Scientific American

Monogamous black-browed albatross may split up from the stress of less food availability. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Biology Animals Environment Climate Change

Ocean 113

Red light therapy could improve eyesight that has declined due to age

New Scientist

Exposure to deep red or near-infrared light can improve the function of the eye’s mitochondria, the powerhouses in cells, resulting in slight but lasting improvement to declining eyesight

2021 112

We Need School-Age Vaccine Mandates to End the COVID Pandemic

Scientific American

Vaccine refusal by parents is not about a lack of education, but amassing social status. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Health Vaccines

2021 100

Survival of the friendliest? Why Homo sapiens outlived other humans

New Scientist

We once shared the planet with at least seven other types of human. Ironically, our success may have been due to our deepest vulnerability: being dependent on others

2021 107

Ag and Food Law Daily Update: November 24, 2021

National Law Center

A comprehensive summary of today’s judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food.

Law 70

What are the four main theories of consciousness?

New Scientist

The idea of what constitutes consciousness is split between the functional and the experiential

2021 103

Electric Utility, Automotive Industries Slow to Reach Carbon Goals, Survey Shows

Environmental Leader

The electric utility and automotive industry are falling behind in reaching carbon goals, according to a new analysis of industry leaders. The post Electric Utility, Automotive Industries Slow to Reach Carbon Goals, Survey Shows appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

Atlantic Ocean water began warming the Arctic as early as 1907

New Scientist

A sediment core from Svalbard has revealed a sudden influx of warm water in the Arctic in 1907, which is evidence of a process that is spurring ice loss

Ocean 102

Microscopy technique inspired by Kelvin reveals long-sought ‘sigma-hole’

Physics World

Positive crown: Schematic view of the experiment used to visualize the sigma-hole on a bromine (Br) atom in a molecule using a scanning microscope tip functionalized with a single xenon (Xe) atom. Courtesy: FZU/DRAWetc).

2021 68

Why maths should move on from the ancient Greeks

New Scientist

Many people experience maths anxiety and some even mention feelings of "rage and despair". One way to improve the subject's perception is by playing down the Platonists, suggests Michael Brooks

2021 100

Electric Utility, Automotive Industries Slow to Reach Carbon Goals, Survey Shows

Environmental Leader

The electric utility and automotive industry are falling behind in reaching carbon goals, according to a new analysis of industry leaders. The post Electric Utility, Automotive Industries Slow to Reach Carbon Goals, Survey Shows appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

Opinion: COP26 and the paradox of last chances

A Greener Life

By Jeremy Williams. It’s been a popular refrain in the run-up to the Glasgow climate talks: this is the last chance to prevent catastrophic climate change. Boris Johnson told his audience it was “one minute to midnight”. John Kerry says it’s our “last best hope.”

2009 67

Sharing is caring: open hardware has global impact

Physics World

The open hardware movement advocates the sharing of designs for material objects. For the global science community it means people can access instructions to 3D print increasingly sophisticated tools.

2021 66

Physicists have created a new type of diamond by crushing buckyballs

New Scientist

A new form of diamond created in the lab is as strong as natural diamond and better able to withstand heat

2021 95

No country has met welfare goals in past 30 years ‘without putting planet at risk’

Yale E360

No country has managed to meet the basic social needs of its population in the past 30 years without putting undue pressure on the Earth’s supply of natural resources, according to a study. Read more on E360

Magnificent photos from the sharp end of historical adventure

New Scientist

Epic expeditions ranging from the ceiling of the world to the frozen poles are captured in glorious photographs in Light and Shadows, an exhibition on now at the Royal Geographical Society

2021 94

Stomping out the spotted lanternfly

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story at The Regulatory Review. The battle against the spotted lanternfly is hobbled by regulatory challenges. Read more → Invasive species Regulation

Black lava from this bizarre volcano could reveal Earth's deep secrets

New Scientist

Tanzania's Ol Doinyo Lengai is the only volcano known to spew out carbonatite lava, which could offer fresh clues about Earth's mysterious mantle – but getting hold of a sample is no simple matter

2021 92

She reclaims toxic waste dumps, and she just won a major landscape architecture award

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story from NPR. Landscape architecture has never quite gotten the adulation of capital-A architecture, but perhaps a new prize can help change that — especially since it’s being given to an innovative designer who’s been respectfully referred to as “the toxic beauty queen of brownfield remediation.”

Waste 63

Physical Activity Could Be an Evolutionary Adaptation for Grandparenting

Scientific American

It may force energy shifts to repair and maintenance, which could slow aging and make us more available to care for younger generations. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. Biology Evolution

2021 88

This company recycles shipping containers into backyard swimming pools

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story at Fast Company. Some shipping containers are single-use, making just one trip across the ocean filled with goods. Modpools gives them a second life as swimming pools. Read more → Circular economy

Ocean 63

Tech companies don’t get science fiction – and that's deeply troubling

New Scientist

Facebook's parent company wants to build a 'metaverse'. The fact that it doesn't grasp the name's connotations is symptomatic of a wider problem, writes Annalee Newitz

2021 88

As federal disaster aid languishes, private lenders are filling the gap

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story in the New York Times. A new program allows Morgan Stanley to front money for disaster repairs and then get paid back, with interest, by taxpayers. Read more → Finance Natural disasters

2021 63

The visionary university solving problems that don’t exist yet

New Scientist

How PR-person logic is challenging the notion of time, plus motion-detecting toilets and “interactive sonification of sexual arousal”, in Feedback’s weekly round-up

2021 88

White House creates new energy division to coordinate climate change policies

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story in the Washington Post. See also coverage in The Hill. The White House has launched a new energy division of its Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and appointed Sally Benson, a well-known energy expert at Stanford University, to a high-level position to coordinate climate change policy. The announcement, scheduled… Read more → Climate change Energy Public policy

Don't miss: The Robinson family's last stand in Lost in Space

New Scientist

New Scientist's weekly round-up of the best books, films, TV series, games and more that you shouldn't miss

2021 88

Giant, free index to world’s research papers released online

Environmental News Bits

Read the full story in Nature. In a project that could unlock the world’s research papers for easier computerized analysis, an American technologist has released online a gigantic index of the words and short phrases contained in more than 100 million journal articles — including many paywalled papers. Read more → Scientific publishing

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